WILBERT

Wildauer Bücher+E-Medien Recherche-Tool

feed icon rss

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    ISSN: 1059-910X
    Keywords: STEM ; PEELS ; HAADFI ; Nanolithography ; Super-resolution ; STM ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Notes: The Microstructural Physics group at the Cavendish Laboratory is actively involved in a considerable number of research projects which cover a broad range of materials science. In this paper, we describe briefly several such projects, with particular emphasis given to the application of parallel-detection electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) on a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to the analysis of materials such as stainless steels, catalysts, and high temperature superconductors. In addition, we describe a number of related projects that are currently being carried out in the group, particularly those which utilise and develop novel STEM imaging and analytical techniques. © 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Additional Material: 19 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Catalysis letters 3 (1989), S. 17-23 
    ISSN: 1572-879X
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Abstract The importance of electron microscopy techniques in tackling catalyst problems is considered. In particular the use of the imaging and spectroscopy facilities of the scanning transmission electron microscope is discussed and illustrated with some recent studies of catalytic materials. The advantages of using non-penetrating incident beams in electron-energy-loss spectroscopy, and glancing incidence microscopy, are especially highlighted.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [S.l.] : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    Journal of Applied Physics 81 (1997), S. 2185-2196 
    ISSN: 1089-7550
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: A series of InGaAs films, compressively or tensilely strained, were grown on (001)InP substrates at 490 °C by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. Compressively strained (−0.5%) (and lattice matched) layers were morphologically stable, but layers grown under tension (+0.5 to +0.6% strain) developed facets on (113)A or (114)A planes. In the first stages of growth of films under tension, and throughout all stages of growth for the compressively strained films, a fine scale (10 nm wavelength) composition modulation was found in the [110] direction. In the later stages of growth of films under tension, the regions of composition segregation were confined to the peaks and valleys of the faceted surface. Regions of high and low stress concentration (the valleys and the peaks) exhibit In/Ga ratios higher or lower, respectively, than the flat faceted surfaces. The elastic strain energy built into the film, associated with the [110] composition modulation, depends on the ratio of the modulation wavelength to film thickness. In films grown under tension, facet coarsening provides a means for the system to reduce the strain energy associated with segregation. Faceting (and facet coarsening) leads to a reduction in the misfit strain energy stored in the film. However, an analysis of the first stages of faceting shows that faceting cannot be explained as a roughening transition. © 1997 American Institute of Physics.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Location Call Number Limitation Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...