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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Protoplasma 211 (2000), S. 198-206 
    ISSN: 1615-6102
    Keywords: Apoptosis ; Atherosclerosis ; Endothelium ; Lipoproteins
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Endothelial lesion by oxidized low-density liproproteins (LDL) is one of the first stages in the development of atherosclerosis. The effect of these lipoproteins can range from a functional lesion of the endothelium to death of the endothelial cells by apoptosis. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are one of the factors which can have a protective effect against the development of atheromatous plaques. The aim of this study is to establish whether the death of endothelial cells by apoptosis induced by oxidized LDLs is prevented by HDLs. ECV304 endothelial cells and bovine aorta endothelial cells were incubated with native LDLs, oxidized LDLs, and a combination of both oxidized LDLs and HDLs. Oxidized LDLs caused a significant increase of mortality mainly by apoptosis. However, when HDLs were added together with oxidized LDLs the percentage of total mortality, the degree of lipoprotein oxidation in the medium, and the percentage of cells in apoptosis were all significantly decreased. HDLs protect against the cytotoxicity of oxidized LDLs possibly by preventing the propagation of the oxidative chain in these lipoproteins.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Calcified tissue international 67 (2000), S. 434-439 
    ISSN: 1432-0827
    Keywords: Key words: VDR — BMD — Linkage — Framingham cohort
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Physics
    Notes: Abstract. Polymorphisms in the region of the gene for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) (chromosome 12q12-14) have been associated with differences in bone mineral density (BMD) in some studies but not in others. Because linkage analysis assesses allele sharing identical-by-descent among relatives instead of the association of a particular allele of an anonymous marker, we have performed a linkage study for bone BMD using microsatellite markers flanking the VDR locus. The present study explores whether or not relatives who share the chromosomal region containing the VDR gene have more similar bone density. Participants in the Framingham Osteoporosis Study (aged 37–89 years) who had undergone BMD testing were used to test for concordance of genotype with phenotype in the hip (femoral neck, Ward's area, trochanter) and lumbar spine (L2-L4) with adjustment for covariates. Multipoint quantitative trait linkage analysis using variance components methods was conducted with microsatellite markers flanking the VDR locus (GATA91H06, GATA5A09, GGAT2G06) in 332 extended families containing 1062 individuals with both bone density measures and marker data. In addition, quantitative trait sib-pair linkage analysis, with a marker (AFM345xf1) in close proximity to the VDR locus, was performed in a second sample of 169 sibships (n = 413), comprising 284 full-sib pairs. Neither analysis revealed evidence for linkage of this region to femoral neck, Ward's area, lumbar spine, and trochanter in age or sex BMI, and height-adjusted bone density measures. Additional adjustment for alcohol intake, caffeine consumption, smoking status, and estrogen supplement (female only) did not alter the results. The present study could not demonstrate linkage of BMD to chromosome 12q12-14. These findings suggest that neither the VDR gene nor other genes at this locus are likely to have a substantial impact upon bone density.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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