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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Biosystems 22 (1989), S. 103-116 
    ISSN: 0303-2647
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell nucleus ; Evolution ; Plants ; Protoctista ; Taxonomy
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2016-04-02
    Description: Recent studies have implicated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) as regulators of many important biological processes. Here we report on the identification and characterization of a lncRNA, lnc13, that harbors a celiac disease-associated haplotype block and represses expression of certain inflammatory genes under homeostatic conditions. Lnc13 regulates gene expression by binding to hnRNPD, a member of a family of ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Upon stimulation, lnc13 levels are reduced, thereby allowing increased expression of the repressed genes. Lnc13 levels are significantly decreased in small intestinal biopsy samples from patients with celiac disease, which suggests that down-regulation of lnc13 may contribute to the inflammation seen in this disease. Furthermore, the lnc13 disease-associated variant binds hnRNPD less efficiently than its wild-type counterpart, thus helping to explain how these single-nucleotide polymorphisms contribute to celiac disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara -- Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora -- Kratchmarov, Radomir -- Luo, Xiaobing -- Bhagat, Govind -- Green, Peter H R -- Schneider, Robert -- Kiledjian, Megerditch -- Bilbao, Jose Ramon -- Ghosh, Sankar -- R01-AI093985/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01-DK102180/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01-GM067005/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R37-AI33443/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Apr 1;352(6281):91-5. doi: 10.1126/science.aad0467.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology, and Animal Physiology, University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU), BioCruces Research Institute, Leioa 48940, Basque Country, Spain. ; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA. ; Center for Celiac Disease, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA. Alexandria Center for Life Sciences, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. ; Alexandria Center for Life Sciences, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. ; Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA. sg2715@columbia.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27034373" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Base Sequence ; Celiac Disease/*genetics/pathology ; Down-Regulation ; Gene Expression Regulation ; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease ; Haplotypes ; Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins/genetics ; Humans ; Inflammation/*genetics ; Mice ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; RNA, Long Noncoding/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2014-09-26
    Description: Billions of organisms, from bacteria to humans, migrate each year and research on their migration biology is expanding rapidly through ever more sophisticated remote sensing technologies. However, little is known about how migratory performance develops through life for any organism. To date, age variation has been almost systematically simplified into a dichotomous comparison between recently born juveniles at their first migration versus adults of unknown age. These comparisons have regularly highlighted better migratory performance by adults compared with juveniles, but it is unknown whether such variation is gradual or abrupt and whether it is driven by improvements within the individual, by selective mortality of poor performers, or both. Here we exploit the opportunity offered by long-term monitoring of individuals through Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite tracking to combine within-individual and cross-sectional data on 364 migration episodes from 92 individuals of a raptorial bird, aged 1-27 years old. We show that the development of migratory behaviour follows a consistent trajectory, more gradual and prolonged than previously appreciated, and that this is promoted by both individual improvements and selective mortality, mainly operating in early life and during the pre-breeding migration. Individuals of different age used different travelling tactics and varied in their ability to exploit tailwinds or to cope with wind drift. All individuals seemed aligned along a race with their contemporary peers, whose outcome was largely determined by the ability to depart early, affecting their subsequent recruitment, reproduction and survival. Understanding how climate change and human action can affect the migration of younger animals may be the key to managing and forecasting the declines of many threatened migrants.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sergio, Fabrizio -- Tanferna, Alessandro -- De Stephanis, Renaud -- Jimenez, Lidia Lopez -- Blas, Julio -- Tavecchia, Giacomo -- Preatoni, Damiano -- Hiraldo, Fernando -- England -- Nature. 2014 Nov 20;515(7527):410-3. doi: 10.1038/nature13696. Epub 2014 Sep 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Conservation Biology, Estacion Biologica de Donana-CSIC, Avenida Americo Vespucio, 41092 Seville, Spain. ; Population Ecology Group, Institute for Mediterranean Studies (IMEDEA), CSIC-UIB, 07190 Esporles, Spain. ; Department of Theoretical and Applied Sciences, Insubria University, 21100 Varese, Italy.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25252973" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Africa ; Age Factors ; Aging/*physiology ; Animal Migration/*physiology ; Animals ; Conservation of Natural Resources ; Geographic Information Systems ; Global Warming ; Human Activities ; Raptors/*physiology ; Reproduction/physiology ; Spain ; Survival Rate ; Time Factors ; Wind
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2015-06-19
    Description: There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. Here we describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the Plasmodium parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single-dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood-stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along messenger RNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4700930/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4700930/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Baragana, Beatriz -- Hallyburton, Irene -- Lee, Marcus C S -- Norcross, Neil R -- Grimaldi, Raffaella -- Otto, Thomas D -- Proto, William R -- Blagborough, Andrew M -- Meister, Stephan -- Wirjanata, Grennady -- Ruecker, Andrea -- Upton, Leanna M -- Abraham, Tara S -- Almeida, Mariana J -- Pradhan, Anupam -- Porzelle, Achim -- Martinez, Maria Santos -- Bolscher, Judith M -- Woodland, Andrew -- Norval, Suzanne -- Zuccotto, Fabio -- Thomas, John -- Simeons, Frederick -- Stojanovski, Laste -- Osuna-Cabello, Maria -- Brock, Paddy M -- Churcher, Tom S -- Sala, Katarzyna A -- Zakutansky, Sara E -- Jimenez-Diaz, Maria Belen -- Sanz, Laura Maria -- Riley, Jennifer -- Basak, Rajshekhar -- Campbell, Michael -- Avery, Vicky M -- Sauerwein, Robert W -- Dechering, Koen J -- Noviyanti, Rintis -- Campo, Brice -- Frearson, Julie A -- Angulo-Barturen, Inigo -- Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago -- Gamo, Francisco Javier -- Wyatt, Paul G -- Leroy, Didier -- Siegl, Peter -- Delves, Michael J -- Kyle, Dennis E -- Wittlin, Sergio -- Marfurt, Jutta -- Price, Ric N -- Sinden, Robert E -- Winzeler, Elizabeth A -- Charman, Susan A -- Bebrevska, Lidiya -- Gray, David W -- Campbell, Simon -- Fairlamb, Alan H -- Willis, Paul A -- Rayner, Julian C -- Fidock, David A -- Read, Kevin D -- Gilbert, Ian H -- 079838/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 091625/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 100476/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- R01 AI090141/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI103058/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jun 18;522(7556):315-20. doi: 10.1038/nature14451.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Drug Discovery Unit, Division of Biological Chemistry and Drug Discovery, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UK. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Malaria Programme, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. ; Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK. ; University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive 0760, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Global Health and Tropical Medicine Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, Darwin, Northern Territory 0811, Australia. ; Department of Global Health, College of Public Health University of South Florida, 3720 Spectrum Boulevard, Suite 304, Tampa, Florida 33612, USA. ; GlaxoSmithKline, Tres Cantos Medicines Development Campus-Diseases of the Developing World, Severo Ochoa 2, Tres Cantos 28760, Madrid, Spain. ; TropIQ Health Sciences, Geert Grooteplein 28, Huispost 268, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands. ; Centre for Drug Candidate Optimisation, Monash University, 381 Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia. ; Eskitis Institute, Brisbane Innovation Park, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4111, Australia. ; Malaria Pathogenesis Laboratory, Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, Jalan Diponegoro 69, 10430 Jakarta, Indonesia. ; Medicines for Malaria Venture, PO Box 1826, 20 route de Pre-Bois, 1215 Geneva 15, Switzerland. ; Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Socinstrasse 57, 4051 Basel, Switzerland. ; 1] Global Health and Tropical Medicine Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, Darwin, Northern Territory 0811, Australia [2] Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LJ, UK. ; 1] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26085270" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antimalarials/administration & dosage/adverse ; effects/pharmacokinetics/*pharmacology ; Drug Discovery ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation/*drug effects ; Life Cycle Stages/drug effects ; Liver/drug effects/parasitology ; Malaria/drug therapy/*parasitology ; Male ; Models, Molecular ; Peptide Elongation Factor 2/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Plasmodium/*drug effects/genetics/growth & development/*metabolism ; Plasmodium berghei/drug effects/physiology ; Plasmodium falciparum/drug effects/metabolism ; Plasmodium vivax/drug effects/metabolism ; Protein Biosynthesis/*drug effects ; Quinolines/administration & dosage/chemistry/pharmacokinetics/*pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2013-04-20
    Description: The circum-Antarctic Southern Ocean is an important region for global marine food webs and carbon cycling because of sea-ice formation and its unique plankton ecosystem. However, the mechanisms underlying the installation of this distinct ecosystem and the geological timing of its development remain unknown. Here, we show, on the basis of fossil marine dinoflagellate cyst records, that a major restructuring of the Southern Ocean plankton ecosystem occurred abruptly and concomitant with the first major Antarctic glaciation in the earliest Oligocene (~33.6 million years ago). This turnover marks a regime shift in zooplankton-phytoplankton interactions and community structure, which indicates the appearance of eutrophic and seasonally productive environments on the Antarctic margin. We conclude that earliest Oligocene cooling, ice-sheet expansion, and subsequent sea-ice formation were important drivers of biotic evolution in the Southern Ocean.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Houben, Alexander J P -- Bijl, Peter K -- Pross, Jorg -- Bohaty, Steven M -- Passchier, Sandra -- Stickley, Catherine E -- Rohl, Ursula -- Sugisaki, Saiko -- Tauxe, Lisa -- van de Flierdt, Tina -- Olney, Matthew -- Sangiorgi, Francesca -- Sluijs, Appy -- Escutia, Carlota -- Brinkhuis, Henk -- Expedition 318 Scientists -- Dotti, Carlota Escutia -- Klaus, Adam -- Fehr, Annick -- Williams, Trevor -- Bendle, James A P -- Carr, Stephanie A -- Dunbar, Robert B -- Flores, Jose-Abel -- Gonzalez, Jhon J -- Hayden, Travis G -- Iwai, Masao -- Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J -- Katsuki, Kota -- Kong, Gee Soo -- McKay, Robert M -- Nakai, Mutsumi -- Pekar, Stephen F -- Riesselman, Christina -- Sakai, Toyosaburo -- Salzmann, Ulrich -- Shrivastava, Prakash K -- Tuo, Shouting -- Welsh, Kevin -- Yamane, Masako -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Apr 19;340(6130):341-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1223646.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Earth Sciences, Laboratory of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Budapestlaan 4, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands. Alexander.Houben@TNO.nl〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23599491" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Adaptation, Physiological ; Animals ; Antarctic Regions ; Cold Temperature ; Dinoflagellida/*physiology ; *Ecosystem ; Fossils ; *Ice Cover ; *Oceans and Seas ; Phytoplankton/*physiology ; Zooplankton/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2016-03-26
    Description: In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope separates the genomic DNA from the cytoplasmic space and regulates protein trafficking between the two compartments. This barrier is only transiently dissolved during mitosis. Here, we found that it also opened at high frequency in migrating mammalian cells during interphase, which allowed nuclear proteins to leak out and cytoplasmic proteins to leak in. This transient opening was caused by nuclear deformation and was rapidly repaired in an ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport)-dependent manner. DNA double-strand breaks coincided with nuclear envelope opening events. As a consequence, survival of cells migrating through confining environments depended on efficient nuclear envelope and DNA repair machineries. Nuclear envelope opening in migrating leukocytes could have potentially important consequences for normal and pathological immune responses.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Raab, M -- Gentili, M -- de Belly, H -- Thiam, H R -- Vargas, P -- Jimenez, A J -- Lautenschlaeger, F -- Voituriez, Raphael -- Lennon-Dumenil, A M -- Manel, N -- Piel, M -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Apr 15;352(6283):359-62. doi: 10.1126/science.aad7611. Epub 2016 Mar 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institut Curie, PSL Research University, CNRS, UMR 144, F-75005 Paris, France. Institut Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, PSL Research University, F-75005 Paris, France. ; Institut Curie, PSL Research University, INSERM, U 932, F-75005 Paris, France. ; Institut Curie, PSL Research University, CNRS, UMR 144, F-75005 Paris, France. ; Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS UMR 7600, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France. Laboratoire Jean Perrin, CNRS UMR 8237, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France. ; Institut Curie, PSL Research University, CNRS, UMR 144, F-75005 Paris, France. Institut Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, PSL Research University, F-75005 Paris, France. matthieu.piel@curie.fr.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27013426" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Death ; *Cell Movement ; Cytoplasm/metabolism ; *DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded ; DNA Repair ; Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport/genetics/*metabolism ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Immunity/genetics ; Interphase ; Leukocytes/immunology/ultrastructure ; Mice ; Nuclear Envelope/*ultrastructure ; Nuclear Proteins/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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