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  • 1
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2012-07-06
    Description: Striated muscles are present in bilaterian animals (for example, vertebrates, insects and annelids) and some non-bilaterian eumetazoans (that is, cnidarians and ctenophores). The considerable ultrastructural similarity of striated muscles between these animal groups is thought to reflect a common evolutionary origin. Here we show that a muscle protein core set, including a type II myosin heavy chain (MyHC) motor protein characteristic of striated muscles in vertebrates, was already present in unicellular organisms before the origin of multicellular animals. Furthermore, 'striated muscle' and 'non-muscle' myhc orthologues are expressed differentially in two sponges, compatible with a functional diversification before the origin of true muscles and the subsequent use of striated muscle MyHC in fast-contracting smooth and striated muscle. Cnidarians and ctenophores possess striated muscle myhc orthologues but lack crucial components of bilaterian striated muscles, such as genes that code for titin and the troponin complex, suggesting the convergent evolution of striated muscles. Consistently, jellyfish orthologues of a shared set of bilaterian Z-disc proteins are not associated with striated muscles, but are instead expressed elsewhere or ubiquitously. The independent evolution of eumetazoan striated muscles through the addition of new proteins to a pre-existing, ancestral contractile apparatus may serve as a model for the evolution of complex animal cell types.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3398149/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3398149/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Steinmetz, Patrick R H -- Kraus, Johanna E M -- Larroux, Claire -- Hammel, Jorg U -- Amon-Hassenzahl, Annette -- Houliston, Evelyn -- Worheide, Gert -- Nickel, Michael -- Degnan, Bernard M -- Technau, Ulrich -- P 21108/Austrian Science Fund FWF/Austria -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jul 12;487(7406):231-4. doi: 10.1038/nature11180.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department for Molecular Evolution and Development, Centre for Organismal Systems Biology, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22763458" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Biological Evolution ; Cnidaria/*anatomy & histology/genetics/metabolism ; Gene Duplication ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Muscle, Striated/metabolism/*physiology ; Myosin Heavy Chains/genetics/metabolism ; Phylogeny
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kraus, Virginia Byers -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 27;507(7493):441-2. doi: 10.1038/507441a.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27701-2047, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670760" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Humans ; Male ; Osteoarthritis/*metabolism/*pathology ; *Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2014-04-11
    Description: In obesity and type 2 diabetes, Glut4 glucose transporter expression is decreased selectively in adipocytes. Adipose-specific knockout or overexpression of Glut4 alters systemic insulin sensitivity. Here we show, using DNA array analyses, that nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (Nnmt) is the most strongly reciprocally regulated gene when comparing gene expression in white adipose tissue (WAT) from adipose-specific Glut4-knockout or adipose-specific Glut4-overexpressing mice with their respective controls. NNMT methylates nicotinamide (vitamin B3) using S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as a methyl donor. Nicotinamide is a precursor of NAD(+), an important cofactor linking cellular redox states with energy metabolism. SAM provides propylamine for polyamine biosynthesis and donates a methyl group for histone methylation. Polyamine flux including synthesis, catabolism and excretion, is controlled by the rate-limiting enzymes ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine-spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT; encoded by Sat1) and by polyamine oxidase (PAO), and has a major role in energy metabolism. We report that NNMT expression is increased in WAT and liver of obese and diabetic mice. Nnmt knockdown in WAT and liver protects against diet-induced obesity by augmenting cellular energy expenditure. NNMT inhibition increases adipose SAM and NAD(+) levels and upregulates ODC and SSAT activity as well as expression, owing to the effects of NNMT on histone H3 lysine 4 methylation in adipose tissue. Direct evidence for increased polyamine flux resulting from NNMT inhibition includes elevated urinary excretion and adipocyte secretion of diacetylspermine, a product of polyamine metabolism. NNMT inhibition in adipocytes increases oxygen consumption in an ODC-, SSAT- and PAO-dependent manner. Thus, NNMT is a novel regulator of histone methylation, polyamine flux and NAD(+)-dependent SIRT1 signalling, and is a unique and attractive target for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4107212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4107212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kraus, Daniel -- Yang, Qin -- Kong, Dong -- Banks, Alexander S -- Zhang, Lin -- Rodgers, Joseph T -- Pirinen, Eija -- Pulinilkunnil, Thomas C -- Gong, Fengying -- Wang, Ya-chin -- Cen, Yana -- Sauve, Anthony A -- Asara, John M -- Peroni, Odile D -- Monia, Brett P -- Bhanot, Sanjay -- Alhonen, Leena -- Puigserver, Pere -- Kahn, Barbara B -- K01 DK094943/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K08 DK090149/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA120964/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA120964/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK040561/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK0460200/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK046200/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK057521/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK57521/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30CA006516-46/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK069966/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK100385/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK69966/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK043051/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK43051/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):258-62. doi: 10.1038/nature13198.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] [3] Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine I, Wurzburg University Hospital, Oberdurrbacher Strasse 6, 97080 Wurzburg, Germany (D.K.); Department of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Diabetes Research and Treatment, and Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA (Q.Y.); Research Programs Unit, Molecular Neurology, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, 00290, Helsinki, Finland (E.P.); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Dalhousie University, Saint John, New Brunswick E2L4L5, USA (T.C.P.); Department of Endocrinology, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology of Ministry of Health, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China (F.G.); School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland (L.A.). ; Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio Campus, PO Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland [2] Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine I, Wurzburg University Hospital, Oberdurrbacher Strasse 6, 97080 Wurzburg, Germany (D.K.); Department of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Diabetes Research and Treatment, and Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA (Q.Y.); Research Programs Unit, Molecular Neurology, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, 00290, Helsinki, Finland (E.P.); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Dalhousie University, Saint John, New Brunswick E2L4L5, USA (T.C.P.); Department of Endocrinology, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology of Ministry of Health, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China (F.G.); School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland (L.A.). ; 1] Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine I, Wurzburg University Hospital, Oberdurrbacher Strasse 6, 97080 Wurzburg, Germany (D.K.); Department of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Diabetes Research and Treatment, and Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA (Q.Y.); Research Programs Unit, Molecular Neurology, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, 00290, Helsinki, Finland (E.P.); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick, Dalhousie University, Saint John, New Brunswick E2L4L5, USA (T.C.P.); Department of Endocrinology, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology of Ministry of Health, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China (F.G.); School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland (L.A.). ; Department of Pharmacology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Division of Signal Transduction, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Isis Pharmaceuticals, 1896 Rutherford Road, Carlsbad, California 92008-7326, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24717514" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetyltransferases/metabolism ; Adipocytes/metabolism/secretion ; Adipose Tissue/enzymology/metabolism ; Adipose Tissue, White/enzymology/metabolism ; Animals ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/enzymology/metabolism ; *Diet ; Energy Metabolism ; Fatty Liver ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Glucose Intolerance ; Glucose Transporter Type 4/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Insulin Resistance ; Liver/enzymology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; NAD/metabolism ; Niacinamide/metabolism ; Nicotinamide N-Methyltransferase/*deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Obesity/*enzymology/etiology/genetics/*prevention & control ; Ornithine Decarboxylase/metabolism ; Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors/metabolism ; S-Adenosylmethionine/metabolism ; Sirtuin 1/metabolism ; Spermine/analogs & derivatives/metabolism ; Thinness/enzymology/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2012-03-01
    Description: Body size plays a critical role in mammalian ecology and physiology. Previous research has shown that many mammals became smaller during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), but the timing and magnitude of that change relative to climate change have been unclear. A high-resolution record of continental climate and equid body size change shows a directional size decrease of ~30% over the first ~130,000 years of the PETM, followed by a ~76% increase in the recovery phase of the PETM. These size changes are negatively correlated with temperature inferred from oxygen isotopes in mammal teeth and were probably driven by shifts in temperature and possibly high atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. These findings could be important for understanding mammalian evolutionary responses to future global warming.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Secord, Ross -- Bloch, Jonathan I -- Chester, Stephen G B -- Boyer, Doug M -- Wood, Aaron R -- Wing, Scott L -- Kraus, Mary J -- McInerney, Francesca A -- Krigbaum, John -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Feb 24;335(6071):959-62. doi: 10.1126/science.1213859.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA. rsecord2@unl.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22363006" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Atmosphere ; *Biological Evolution ; Body Size ; Carbon Dioxide/analysis ; *Climate Change ; Equidae/*anatomy & histology ; *Fossils ; Global Warming ; Horses/*anatomy & histology ; Humidity ; Oxygen Isotopes/analysis ; Temperature ; Wyoming
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-05-16
    Description: The evolution of eusociality is one of the major transitions in evolution, but the underlying genomic changes are unknown. We compared the genomes of 10 bee species that vary in social complexity, representing multiple independent transitions in social evolution, and report three major findings. First, many important genes show evidence of neutral evolution as a consequence of relaxed selection with increasing social complexity. Second, there is no single road map to eusociality; independent evolutionary transitions in sociality have independent genetic underpinnings. Third, though clearly independent in detail, these transitions do have similar general features, including an increase in constrained protein evolution accompanied by increases in the potential for gene regulation and decreases in diversity and abundance of transposable elements. Eusociality may arise through different mechanisms each time, but would likely always involve an increase in the complexity of gene networks.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kapheim, Karen M -- Pan, Hailin -- Li, Cai -- Salzberg, Steven L -- Puiu, Daniela -- Magoc, Tanja -- Robertson, Hugh M -- Hudson, Matthew E -- Venkat, Aarti -- Fischman, Brielle J -- Hernandez, Alvaro -- Yandell, Mark -- Ence, Daniel -- Holt, Carson -- Yocum, George D -- Kemp, William P -- Bosch, Jordi -- Waterhouse, Robert M -- Zdobnov, Evgeny M -- Stolle, Eckart -- Kraus, F Bernhard -- Helbing, Sophie -- Moritz, Robin F A -- Glastad, Karl M -- Hunt, Brendan G -- Goodisman, Michael A D -- Hauser, Frank -- Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P -- Pinheiro, Daniel Guariz -- Nunes, Francis Morais Franco -- Soares, Michelle Prioli Miranda -- Tanaka, Erica Donato -- Simoes, Zila Luz Paulino -- Hartfelder, Klaus -- Evans, Jay D -- Barribeau, Seth M -- Johnson, Reed M -- Massey, Jonathan H -- Southey, Bruce R -- Hasselmann, Martin -- Hamacher, Daniel -- Biewer, Matthias -- Kent, Clement F -- Zayed, Amro -- Blatti, Charles 3rd -- Sinha, Saurabh -- Johnston, J Spencer -- Hanrahan, Shawn J -- Kocher, Sarah D -- Wang, Jun -- Robinson, Gene E -- Zhang, Guojie -- DP1 OD006416/OD/NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 5;348(6239):1139-43. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa4788. Epub 2015 May 14.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Carl R. WoeseInstitute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Department of Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA. karen.kapheim@usu.edu wangj@genomics.org.cn generobi@illinois.edu zhanggj@genomics.org.cn. ; China National GeneBank, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. ; China National GeneBank, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 1350, Denmark. ; Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Computer Science, and Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA. Center for Computational Biology, McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. ; Center for Computational Biology, McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. ; Carl R. WoeseInstitute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Department of Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. ; Carl R. WoeseInstitute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. ; Carl R. WoeseInstitute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ; Carl R. WoeseInstitute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Department of Biology, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY 14456, USA. ; Roy J. Carver Biotechnology Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. ; Department of Human Genetics, Eccles Institute of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. USTAR Center for Genetic Discovery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. ; Department of Human Genetics, Eccles Institute of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. ; U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) Red River Valley Agricultural Research Center, Biosciences Research Laboratory, Fargo, ND 58102, USA. ; Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain. ; Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. ; Institute of Biology, Department Zoology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Hoher Weg 4, D-06099 Halle (Saale), Germany. Queen Mary University of London, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences Organismal Biology Research Group, London E1 4NS, UK. ; Institute of Biology, Department Zoology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Hoher Weg 4, D-06099 Halle (Saale), Germany. Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital Halle, Ernst Grube Strasse 40, D-06120 Halle (Saale), Germany. ; Institute of Biology, Department Zoology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Hoher Weg 4, D-06099 Halle (Saale), Germany. ; Institute of Biology, Department Zoology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Hoher Weg 4, D-06099 Halle (Saale), Germany. German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Halle-Jena-Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. ; School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA. ; Department of Entomology, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223, USA. ; Center for Functional and Comparative Insect Genomics, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ; Departamento de Biologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil. Departamento de Tecnologia, Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), 14884-900 Jaboticabal, SP, Brazil. ; Departamento de Genetica e Evolucao, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas e da Saude, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil. ; Departamento de Biologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil. ; Departamento de Genetica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil. ; Departamento de Biologia Celular e Molecular e Bioagentes Patogenicos, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil. ; USDA-ARS Bee Research Lab, Beltsville, MD 20705 USA. ; Department of Biology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858, USA. ; Department of Entomology, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 44691, USA. ; Department of Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. ; Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. ; Department of Population Genomics, Institute of Animal Husbandry and Animal Breeding, University of Hohenheim, Germany. ; Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada. Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institue, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA. ; Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada. ; Carl R. WoeseInstitute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. ; Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA. ; Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. ; China National GeneBank, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. Princess Al Jawhara Center of Excellence in the Research of Hereditary Disorders, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. Macau University of Science and Technology, Avenida Wai long, Taipa, Macau 999078, China. Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. karen.kapheim@usu.edu wangj@genomics.org.cn generobi@illinois.edu zhanggj@genomics.org.cn. ; Carl R. WoeseInstitute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Center for Advanced Study Professor in Entomology and Neuroscience, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. karen.kapheim@usu.edu wangj@genomics.org.cn generobi@illinois.edu zhanggj@genomics.org.cn. ; China National GeneBank, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, 518083, China. Centre for Social Evolution, Department of Biology, Universitetsparken 15, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.kapheim@usu.edu wangj@genomics.org.cn generobi@illinois.edu zhanggj@genomics.org.cn.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25977371" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino-Acid N-Acetyltransferase ; Animals ; Bees/classification/*genetics ; DNA Transposable Elements ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Gene Regulatory Networks ; *Genetic Drift ; Genome, Insect/genetics ; Phylogeny ; Selection, Genetic ; *Social Behavior ; Transcription Factors/chemistry/genetics ; *Transcriptome
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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