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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Journal of chemical ecology 11 (1985), S. 409-416 
    ISSN: 1573-1561
    Keywords: Alarm substances ; nest defense ; 2-heptanol ; 2-nonanol ; mandibular gland ; Hymenoptera ; Apidae ; Meliponinae ; stingless bees ; Trigona silvestriana
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Abstract 2-Nonanol, 2-heptanol, octyl decanoate, and octyl octanoate were identified from the heads ofTrigona silvestriana workers. When presented at the nest, 2-nonanol, 2-heptanol, and the mixture of the four compounds elicited angular flights, landing, and buzzing of guard bees. Octyl octanoate elicited a weaker response. No response was given to octyl decanoate, to the ether solvent, or to the control volatile, vanillin.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Journal of chemical ecology 8 (1982), S. 1167-1181 
    ISSN: 1573-1561
    Keywords: Alarm substance ; nest defense ; nerol ; mandibular gland ; Hymenoptera ; Apidae ; Meliponinae ; stingless bees ; Trigona fulviventris ; Apiomerus pictipes ; Hemiptera ; Reduviidae
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Abstract Bees of the genusTrigona and subgenusTrigona possess volatile materials in their mandibular glands, used as alarm substances and as marking pheromones. Heads of workers ofTrigona fulviventris were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The two major volatile components were nerol (∼ 50%), and octyl caproate (∼ 20%). Relative to other substances tested at a Costa Rican nest, treatments containing 20 μg of nerol attractedT. fulviventris, depressed numbers of bees leaving the nest by about 50%, and elicited wing vibration and biting. The responses were similar to those obtained with the contents of one worker head. Attraction and biting were also seen in response to captures of colony members by assassin bugs (Apiomerus pictipes) outside a nest entrance; one bee responded in about 15% of the captures. This alarm behavior, although weak, is of interest since it was thought thatT. fulviventris was unusual for its subgenus in its lack of nest defense behaviors.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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