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  • Cell Line, Tumor  (94)
  • Nature Publishing Group (NPG)  (94)
  • 1
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2016-02-26
    Description: Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-beta, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bailey, Peter -- Chang, David K -- Nones, Katia -- Johns, Amber L -- Patch, Ann-Marie -- Gingras, Marie-Claude -- Miller, David K -- Christ, Angelika N -- Bruxner, Tim J C -- Quinn, Michael C -- Nourse, Craig -- Murtaugh, L Charles -- Harliwong, Ivon -- Idrisoglu, Senel -- Manning, Suzanne -- Nourbakhsh, Ehsan -- Wani, Shivangi -- Fink, Lynn -- Holmes, Oliver -- Chin, Venessa -- Anderson, Matthew J -- Kazakoff, Stephen -- Leonard, Conrad -- Newell, Felicity -- Waddell, Nick -- Wood, Scott -- Xu, Qinying -- Wilson, Peter J -- Cloonan, Nicole -- Kassahn, Karin S -- Taylor, Darrin -- Quek, Kelly -- Robertson, Alan -- Pantano, Lorena -- Mincarelli, Laura -- Sanchez, Luis N -- Evers, Lisa -- Wu, Jianmin -- Pinese, Mark -- Cowley, Mark J -- Jones, Marc D -- Colvin, Emily K -- Nagrial, Adnan M -- Humphrey, Emily S -- Chantrill, Lorraine A -- Mawson, Amanda -- Humphris, Jeremy -- Chou, Angela -- Pajic, Marina -- Scarlett, Christopher J -- Pinho, Andreia V -- Giry-Laterriere, Marc -- Rooman, Ilse -- Samra, Jaswinder S -- Kench, James G -- Lovell, Jessica A -- Merrett, Neil D -- Toon, Christopher W -- Epari, Krishna -- Nguyen, Nam Q -- Barbour, Andrew -- Zeps, Nikolajs -- Moran-Jones, Kim -- Jamieson, Nigel B -- Graham, Janet S -- Duthie, Fraser -- Oien, Karin -- Hair, Jane -- Grutzmann, Robert -- Maitra, Anirban -- Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A -- Wolfgang, Christopher L -- Morgan, Richard A -- Lawlor, Rita T -- Corbo, Vincenzo -- Bassi, Claudio -- Rusev, Borislav -- Capelli, Paola -- Salvia, Roberto -- Tortora, Giampaolo -- Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata -- Petersen, Gloria M -- Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative -- Munzy, Donna M -- Fisher, William E -- Karim, Saadia A -- Eshleman, James R -- Hruban, Ralph H -- Pilarsky, Christian -- Morton, Jennifer P -- Sansom, Owen J -- Scarpa, Aldo -- Musgrove, Elizabeth A -- Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo -- Hofmann, Oliver -- Sutherland, Robert L -- Wheeler, David A -- Gill, Anthony J -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Pearson, John V -- Waddell, Nicola -- Biankin, Andrew V -- Grimmond, Sean M -- 103721/Z/14/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- A12481/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A18076/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- C29717/A17263/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 3;531(7592):47-52. doi: 10.1038/nature16965. Epub 2016 Feb 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. ; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. ; The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. ; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. ; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. ; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. ; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. ; Genetic and Molecular Pathology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. ; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. ; Harvard Chan Bioinformatics Core, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales 2560, Australia. ; Department of Pathology. SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. ; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052, Australia. ; School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. ; Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. ; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. ; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown New South Wales 2050, Australia. ; School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. ; Fiona Stanley Hospital, Robin Warren Drive, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia. ; Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. ; Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. ; School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands 6009, Australia and St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. ; Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. ; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. ; Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. ; GGC Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TY, UK. ; Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. ; Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. ; The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. ; Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. ; ARC-Net Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. ; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. ; Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. ; Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. ; Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. ; University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26909576" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/genetics ; Carcinoma, Pancreatic ; Ductal/classification/genetics/immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; DNA Methylation ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Regulatory Networks ; Genes, Neoplasm/*genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; *Genomics ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3-beta/genetics ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3-gamma/genetics ; Histone Demethylases/genetics ; Homeodomain Proteins/genetics ; Humans ; Mice ; Mutation/*genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*classification/*genetics/immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Prognosis ; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/genetics ; Survival Analysis ; Trans-Activators/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics ; Transcription, Genetic ; Transcriptome ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2011-01-21
    Description: The genetics of renal cancer is dominated by inactivation of the VHL tumour suppressor gene in clear cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the commonest histological subtype. A recent large-scale screen of approximately 3,500 genes by PCR-based exon re-sequencing identified several new cancer genes in ccRCC including UTX (also known as KDM6A), JARID1C (also known as KDM5C) and SETD2 (ref. 2). These genes encode enzymes that demethylate (UTX, JARID1C) or methylate (SETD2) key lysine residues of histone H3. Modification of the methylation state of these lysine residues of histone H3 regulates chromatin structure and is implicated in transcriptional control. However, together these mutations are present in fewer than 15% of ccRCC, suggesting the existence of additional, currently unidentified cancer genes. Here, we have sequenced the protein coding exome in a series of primary ccRCC and report the identification of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex gene PBRM1 (ref. 4) as a second major ccRCC cancer gene, with truncating mutations in 41% (92/227) of cases. These data further elucidate the somatic genetic architecture of ccRCC and emphasize the marked contribution of aberrant chromatin biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3030920/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3030920/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Varela, Ignacio -- Tarpey, Patrick -- Raine, Keiran -- Huang, Dachuan -- Ong, Choon Kiat -- Stephens, Philip -- Davies, Helen -- Jones, David -- Lin, Meng-Lay -- Teague, Jon -- Bignell, Graham -- Butler, Adam -- Cho, Juok -- Dalgliesh, Gillian L -- Galappaththige, Danushka -- Greenman, Chris -- Hardy, Claire -- Jia, Mingming -- Latimer, Calli -- Lau, King Wai -- Marshall, John -- McLaren, Stuart -- Menzies, Andrew -- Mudie, Laura -- Stebbings, Lucy -- Largaespada, David A -- Wessels, L F A -- Richard, Stephane -- Kahnoski, Richard J -- Anema, John -- Tuveson, David A -- Perez-Mancera, Pedro A -- Mustonen, Ville -- Fischer, Andrej -- Adams, David J -- Rust, Alistair -- Chan-on, Waraporn -- Subimerb, Chutima -- Dykema, Karl -- Furge, Kyle -- Campbell, Peter J -- Teh, Bin Tean -- Stratton, Michael R -- Futreal, P Andrew -- 077012/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 077012/Z/05/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 093867/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- R01 CA113636/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA134759/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jan 27;469(7331):539-42. doi: 10.1038/nature09639. Epub 2011 Jan 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21248752" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Carcinoma, Renal Cell/*genetics ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Disease Models, Animal ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Humans ; Kidney Neoplasms/*genetics ; Mice ; Mutation/*genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/*genetics/*metabolism ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/genetics ; Transcription Factors/*genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2012-06-16
    Description: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) remains a lethal malignancy despite much progress concerning its molecular characterization. PDA tumours harbour four signature somatic mutations in addition to numerous lower frequency genetic events of uncertain significance. Here we use Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis in a mouse model of pancreatic ductal preneoplasia to identify genes that cooperate with oncogenic Kras(G12D) to accelerate tumorigenesis and promote progression. Our screen revealed new candidate genes for PDA and confirmed the importance of many genes and pathways previously implicated in human PDA. The most commonly mutated gene was the X-linked deubiquitinase Usp9x, which was inactivated in over 50% of the tumours. Although previous work had attributed a pro-survival role to USP9X in human neoplasia, we found instead that loss of Usp9x enhances transformation and protects pancreatic cancer cells from anoikis. Clinically, low USP9X protein and messenger RNA expression in PDA correlates with poor survival after surgery, and USP9X levels are inversely associated with metastatic burden in advanced disease. Furthermore, chromatin modulation with trichostatin A or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine elevates USP9X expression in human PDA cell lines, indicating a clinical approach for certain patients. The conditional deletion of Usp9x cooperated with Kras(G12D) to accelerate pancreatic tumorigenesis in mice, validating their genetic interaction. We propose that USP9X is a major tumour suppressor gene with prognostic and therapeutic relevance in PDA.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3376394/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3376394/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Perez-Mancera, Pedro A -- Rust, Alistair G -- van der Weyden, Louise -- Kristiansen, Glen -- Li, Allen -- Sarver, Aaron L -- Silverstein, Kevin A T -- Grutzmann, Robert -- Aust, Daniela -- Rummele, Petra -- Knosel, Thomas -- Herd, Colin -- Stemple, Derek L -- Kettleborough, Ross -- Brosnan, Jacqueline A -- Li, Ang -- Morgan, Richard -- Knight, Spencer -- Yu, Jun -- Stegeman, Shane -- Collier, Lara S -- ten Hoeve, Jelle J -- de Ridder, Jeroen -- Klein, Alison P -- Goggins, Michael -- Hruban, Ralph H -- Chang, David K -- Biankin, Andrew V -- Grimmond, Sean M -- Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative -- Wessels, Lodewyk F A -- Wood, Stephen A -- Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A -- Pilarsky, Christian -- Largaespada, David A -- Adams, David J -- Tuveson, David A -- 13031/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- 2P50CA101955/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA106610/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA122183/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA128920/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA62924/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K01 CA122183/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K01 CA122183-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA101955/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50CA62924/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 29;486(7402):266-70. doi: 10.1038/nature11114.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Li Ka Shing Centre, Cambridge Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22699621" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anoikis/genetics ; Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/*enzymology/genetics/pathology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Disease Models, Animal ; Endopeptidases ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Humans ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*enzymology/genetics/pathology ; U937 Cells ; Ubiquitin Thiolesterase/*genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2014-09-16
    Description: The Ras-like GTPases RalA and RalB are important drivers of tumour growth and metastasis. Chemicals that block Ral function would be valuable as research tools and for cancer therapeutics. Here we used protein structure analysis and virtual screening to identify drug-like molecules that bind to a site on the GDP-bound form of Ral. The compounds RBC6, RBC8 and RBC10 inhibited the binding of Ral to its effector RALBP1, as well as inhibiting Ral-mediated cell spreading of murine embryonic fibroblasts and anchorage-independent growth of human cancer cell lines. The binding of the RBC8 derivative BQU57 to RalB was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance and (1)H-(15)N transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) NMR spectroscopy. RBC8 and BQU57 show selectivity for Ral relative to the GTPases Ras and RhoA and inhibit tumour xenograft growth to a similar extent to the depletion of Ral using RNA interference. Our results show the utility of structure-based discovery for the development of therapeutics for Ral-dependent cancers.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4351747/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4351747/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yan, Chao -- Liu, Degang -- Li, Liwei -- Wempe, Michael F -- Guin, Sunny -- Khanna, May -- Meier, Jeremy -- Hoffman, Brenton -- Owens, Charles -- Wysoczynski, Christina L -- Nitz, Matthew D -- Knabe, William E -- Ahmed, Mansoor -- Brautigan, David L -- Paschal, Bryce M -- Schwartz, Martin A -- Jones, David N M -- Ross, David -- Meroueh, Samy O -- Theodorescu, Dan -- CA075115/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA091846/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA104106/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- GM47214/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA104106/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA044579/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA046934/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA091846/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA075115/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA143971/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007635/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR001082/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- UL1TR001082/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Nov 20;515(7527):443-7. doi: 10.1038/nature13713. Epub 2014 Sep 14.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. ; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. ; Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, USA. ; Department of Pharmacology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. ; Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, USA. ; 1] Department of Cardiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA [2] Department of Cell Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA [2] Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Indiana University - Purdue University, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. ; 1] Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA [2] Department of Pharmacology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA [3] University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25219851" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters/metabolism ; Animals ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation/drug effects ; Computer Simulation ; *Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor ; Female ; GTPase-Activating Proteins/metabolism ; Humans ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; *Molecular Targeted Therapy ; Neoplasms/drug therapy/enzymology/metabolism/pathology ; Protein Binding/drug effects ; Signal Transduction/drug effects ; Small Molecule Libraries/*chemistry/*pharmacology ; Substrate Specificity ; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays ; ral GTP-Binding Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/metabolism ; ras Proteins/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-04-08
    Description: Despite the high prevalence and poor outcome of patients with metastatic lung cancer the mechanisms of tumour progression and metastasis remain largely uncharacterized. Here we modelled human lung adenocarcinoma, which frequently harbours activating point mutations in KRAS and inactivation of the p53 pathway, using conditional alleles in mice. Lentiviral-mediated somatic activation of oncogenic Kras and deletion of p53 in the lung epithelial cells of Kras(LSL-G12D/+);p53(flox/flox) mice initiates lung adenocarcinoma development. Although tumours are initiated synchronously by defined genetic alterations, only a subset becomes malignant, indicating that disease progression requires additional alterations. Identification of the lentiviral integration sites allowed us to distinguish metastatic from non-metastatic tumours and determine the gene expression alterations that distinguish these tumour types. Cross-species analysis identified the NK2-related homeobox transcription factor Nkx2-1 (also called Ttf-1 or Titf1) as a candidate suppressor of malignant progression. In this mouse model, Nkx2-1 negativity is pathognomonic of high-grade poorly differentiated tumours. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments in cells derived from metastatic and non-metastatic tumours demonstrated that Nkx2-1 controls tumour differentiation and limits metastatic potential in vivo. Interrogation of Nkx2-1-regulated genes, analysis of tumours at defined developmental stages, and functional complementation experiments indicate that Nkx2-1 constrains tumours in part by repressing the embryonically restricted chromatin regulator Hmga2. Whereas focal amplification of NKX2-1 in a fraction of human lung adenocarcinomas has focused attention on its oncogenic function, our data specifically link Nkx2-1 downregulation to loss of differentiation, enhanced tumour seeding ability and increased metastatic proclivity. Thus, the oncogenic and suppressive functions of Nkx2-1 in the same tumour type substantiate its role as a dual function lineage factor.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3088778/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3088778/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Winslow, Monte M -- Dayton, Talya L -- Verhaak, Roel G W -- Kim-Kiselak, Caroline -- Snyder, Eric L -- Feldser, David M -- Hubbard, Diana D -- DuPage, Michel J -- Whittaker, Charles A -- Hoersch, Sebastian -- Yoon, Stephanie -- Crowley, Denise -- Bronson, Roderick T -- Chiang, Derek Y -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Jacks, Tyler -- K08 CA154784/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K99-CA151968/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA014051/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA014051-36/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA014051-37/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA014051-38/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA014051-39/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA014051-40/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30-CA14051/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R00 CA151968/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA109038/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32-HL007627/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA084306/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA084306-11/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA084306-12/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA084306-13/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01-CA84306/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 May 5;473(7345):101-4. doi: 10.1038/nature09881. Epub 2011 Apr 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21471965" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenocarcinoma/genetics/physiopathology ; Animals ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Disease Models, Animal ; Down-Regulation ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; HMGA2 Protein/genetics ; Humans ; Lung Neoplasms/genetics/physiopathology ; Mice ; Nuclear Proteins/*genetics/*metabolism ; Transcription Factors/*genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2016-03-05
    Description: The most recent Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, which was unprecedented in the number of cases and fatalities, geographic distribution, and number of nations affected, highlights the need for safe, effective, and readily available antiviral agents for treatment and prevention of acute Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) or sequelae. No antiviral therapeutics have yet received regulatory approval or demonstrated clinical efficacy. Here we report the discovery of a novel small molecule GS-5734, a monophosphoramidate prodrug of an adenosine analogue, with antiviral activity against EBOV. GS-5734 exhibits antiviral activity against multiple variants of EBOV and other filoviruses in cell-based assays. The pharmacologically active nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) is efficiently formed in multiple human cell types incubated with GS-5734 in vitro, and the NTP acts as an alternative substrate and RNA-chain terminator in primer-extension assays using a surrogate respiratory syncytial virus RNA polymerase. Intravenous administration of GS-5734 to nonhuman primates resulted in persistent NTP levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (half-life, 14 h) and distribution to sanctuary sites for viral replication including testes, eyes, and brain. In a rhesus monkey model of EVD, once-daily intravenous administration of 10 mg kg(-1) GS-5734 for 12 days resulted in profound suppression of EBOV replication and protected 100% of EBOV-infected animals against lethal disease, ameliorating clinical disease signs and pathophysiological markers, even when treatments were initiated three days after virus exposure when systemic viral RNA was detected in two out of six treated animals. These results show the first substantive post-exposure protection by a small-molecule antiviral compound against EBOV in nonhuman primates. The broad-spectrum antiviral activity of GS-5734 in vitro against other pathogenic RNA viruses, including filoviruses, arenaviruses, and coronaviruses, suggests the potential for wider medical use. GS-5734 is amenable to large-scale manufacturing, and clinical studies investigating the drug safety and pharmacokinetics are ongoing.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Warren, Travis K -- Jordan, Robert -- Lo, Michael K -- Ray, Adrian S -- Mackman, Richard L -- Soloveva, Veronica -- Siegel, Dustin -- Perron, Michel -- Bannister, Roy -- Hui, Hon C -- Larson, Nate -- Strickley, Robert -- Wells, Jay -- Stuthman, Kelly S -- Van Tongeren, Sean A -- Garza, Nicole L -- Donnelly, Ginger -- Shurtleff, Amy C -- Retterer, Cary J -- Gharaibeh, Dima -- Zamani, Rouzbeh -- Kenny, Tara -- Eaton, Brett P -- Grimes, Elizabeth -- Welch, Lisa S -- Gomba, Laura -- Wilhelmsen, Catherine L -- Nichols, Donald K -- Nuss, Jonathan E -- Nagle, Elyse R -- Kugelman, Jeffrey R -- Palacios, Gustavo -- Doerffler, Edward -- Neville, Sean -- Carra, Ernest -- Clarke, Michael O -- Zhang, Lijun -- Lew, Willard -- Ross, Bruce -- Wang, Queenie -- Chun, Kwon -- Wolfe, Lydia -- Babusis, Darius -- Park, Yeojin -- Stray, Kirsten M -- Trancheva, Iva -- Feng, Joy Y -- Barauskas, Ona -- Xu, Yili -- Wong, Pamela -- Braun, Molly R -- Flint, Mike -- McMullan, Laura K -- Chen, Shan-Shan -- Fearns, Rachel -- Swaminathan, Swami -- Mayers, Douglas L -- Spiropoulou, Christina F -- Lee, William A -- Nichol, Stuart T -- Cihlar, Tomas -- Bavari, Sina -- R01 AI113321/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01AI113321/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 17;531(7594):381-5. doi: 10.1038/nature17180. Epub 2016 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA. ; United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Therapeutic Development Center, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA. ; Gilead Sciences, Foster City, California 94404, USA. ; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. ; Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26934220" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alanine/*analogs & derivatives/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology/*therapeutic use ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Ebolavirus/drug effects ; Female ; HeLa Cells ; Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/*drug therapy/prevention & control ; Humans ; Macaca mulatta/*virology ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Organ Specificity ; Prodrugs/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Ribonucleotides/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology/*therapeutic use
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2011-06-28
    Description: Editing of the human genome to correct disease-causing mutations is a promising approach for the treatment of genetic disorders. Genome editing improves on simple gene-replacement strategies by effecting in situ correction of a mutant gene, thus restoring normal gene function under the control of endogenous regulatory elements and reducing risks associated with random insertion into the genome. Gene-specific targeting has historically been limited to mouse embryonic stem cells. The development of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) has permitted efficient genome editing in transformed and primary cells that were previously thought to be intractable to such genetic manipulation. In vitro, ZFNs have been shown to promote efficient genome editing via homology-directed repair by inducing a site-specific double-strand break (DSB) at a target locus, but it is unclear whether ZFNs can induce DSBs and stimulate genome editing at a clinically meaningful level in vivo. Here we show that ZFNs are able to induce DSBs efficiently when delivered directly to mouse liver and that, when co-delivered with an appropriately designed gene-targeting vector, they can stimulate gene replacement through both homology-directed and homology-independent targeted gene insertion at the ZFN-specified locus. The level of gene targeting achieved was sufficient to correct the prolonged clotting times in a mouse model of haemophilia B, and remained persistent after induced liver regeneration. Thus, ZFN-driven gene correction can be achieved in vivo, raising the possibility of genome editing as a viable strategy for the treatment of genetic disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3152293/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3152293/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Hojun -- Haurigot, Virginia -- Doyon, Yannick -- Li, Tianjian -- Wong, Sunnie Y -- Bhagwat, Anand S -- Malani, Nirav -- Anguela, Xavier M -- Sharma, Rajiv -- Ivanciu, Lacramiora -- Murphy, Samuel L -- Finn, Jonathan D -- Khazi, Fayaz R -- Zhou, Shangzhen -- Paschon, David E -- Rebar, Edward J -- Bushman, Frederic D -- Gregory, Philip D -- Holmes, Michael C -- High, Katherine A -- P01 HL064190/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 HL064190-11A1/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- T32 HL007150/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- T32 HL007150-35/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jun 26;475(7355):217-21. doi: 10.1038/nature10177.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Hematology, CTRB 5000, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3501 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21706032" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Base Sequence ; Cell Line, Tumor ; DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded ; DNA Repair/*genetics ; *Disease Models, Animal ; Endonucleases/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Exons/genetics ; Factor IX/analysis/genetics ; Gene Targeting/*methods ; Genetic Therapy/*methods ; Genetic Vectors/genetics ; Genome/*genetics ; HEK293 Cells ; Hemophilia B/*genetics/physiopathology ; *Hemostasis ; Humans ; Introns/genetics ; Liver/metabolism ; Liver Regeneration ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mutation/genetics ; Phenotype ; Sequence Homology ; Zinc Fingers
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2011-07-16
    Description: Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to drive macromolecular biosynthesis for rapid cell growth and proliferation. RNA interference (RNAi)-based loss-of-function screening has proven powerful for the identification of new and interesting cancer targets, and recent studies have used this technology in vivo to identify novel tumour suppressor genes. Here we developed a method for identifying novel cancer targets via negative-selection RNAi screening using a human breast cancer xenograft model at an orthotopic site in the mouse. Using this method, we screened a set of metabolic genes associated with aggressive breast cancer and stemness to identify those required for in vivo tumorigenesis. Among the genes identified, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) is in a genomic region of recurrent copy number gain in breast cancer and PHGDH protein levels are elevated in 70% of oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancers. PHGDH catalyses the first step in the serine biosynthesis pathway, and breast cancer cells with high PHGDH expression have increased serine synthesis flux. Suppression of PHGDH in cell lines with elevated PHGDH expression, but not in those without, causes a strong decrease in cell proliferation and a reduction in serine synthesis. We find that PHGDH suppression does not affect intracellular serine levels, but causes a drop in the levels of alpha-ketoglutarate, another output of the pathway and a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. In cells with high PHGDH expression, the serine synthesis pathway contributes approximately 50% of the total anaplerotic flux of glutamine into the TCA cycle. These results reveal that certain breast cancers are dependent upon increased serine pathway flux caused by PHGDH overexpression and demonstrate the utility of in vivo negative-selection RNAi screens for finding potential anticancer targets.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3353325/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3353325/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Possemato, Richard -- Marks, Kevin M -- Shaul, Yoav D -- Pacold, Michael E -- Kim, Dohoon -- Birsoy, Kivanc -- Sethumadhavan, Shalini -- Woo, Hin-Koon -- Jang, Hyun G -- Jha, Abhishek K -- Chen, Walter W -- Barrett, Francesca G -- Stransky, Nicolas -- Tsun, Zhi-Yang -- Cowley, Glenn S -- Barretina, Jordi -- Kalaany, Nada Y -- Hsu, Peggy P -- Ottina, Kathleen -- Chan, Albert M -- Yuan, Bingbing -- Garraway, Levi A -- Root, David E -- Mino-Kenudson, Mari -- Brachtel, Elena F -- Driggers, Edward M -- Sabatini, David M -- CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866-06A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866-07/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105-02/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Aug 18;476(7360):346-50. doi: 10.1038/nature10350.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Nine Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21760589" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism ; Breast Neoplasms/enzymology/*genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; Citric Acid Cycle/physiology ; Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; *Genomics ; Glutamic Acid/metabolism ; Humans ; Ketoglutaric Acids/metabolism ; Melanoma/enzymology/genetics ; Mice ; Neoplasm Transplantation ; Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase/genetics/metabolism ; RNA Interference ; Serine/*biosynthesis
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2016-04-07
    Description: Neoplastic pancreatic epithelial cells are believed to die through caspase 8-dependent apoptotic cell death, and chemotherapy is thought to promote tumour apoptosis. Conversely, cancer cells often disrupt apoptosis to survive. Another type of programmed cell death is necroptosis (programmed necrosis), but its role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is unclear. There are many potential inducers of necroptosis in PDA, including ligation of tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), CD95, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, Toll-like receptors, reactive oxygen species, and chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we report that the principal components of the necrosome, receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 and RIP3, are highly expressed in PDA and are further upregulated by the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine. Blockade of the necrosome in vitro promoted cancer cell proliferation and induced an aggressive oncogenic phenotype. By contrast, in vivo deletion of RIP3 or inhibition of RIP1 protected against oncogenic progression in mice and was associated with the development of a highly immunogenic myeloid and T cell infiltrate. The immune-suppressive tumour microenvironment associated with intact RIP1/RIP3 signalling depended in part on necroptosis-induced expression of the chemokine attractant CXCL1, and CXCL1 blockade protected against PDA. Moreover, cytoplasmic SAP130 (a subunit of the histone deacetylase complex) was expressed in PDA in a RIP1/RIP3-dependent manner, and Mincle--its cognate receptor--was upregulated in tumour-infiltrating myeloid cells. Ligation of Mincle by SAP130 promoted oncogenesis, whereas deletion of Mincle protected against oncogenesis and phenocopied the immunogenic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment that was induced by RIP3 deletion. Cellular depletion suggested that whereas inhibitory macrophages promote tumorigenesis in PDA, they lose their immune-suppressive effects when RIP3 or Mincle is deleted. Accordingly, T cells, which are not protective against PDA progression in mice with intact RIP3 or Mincle signalling, are reprogrammed into indispensable mediators of anti-tumour immunity in the absence of RIP3 or Mincle. Our work describes parallel networks of necroptosis-induced CXCL1 and Mincle signalling that promote macrophage-induced adaptive immune suppression and thereby enable PDA progression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4833566/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4833566/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Seifert, Lena -- Werba, Gregor -- Tiwari, Shaun -- Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc -- Alothman, Sara -- Alqunaibit, Dalia -- Avanzi, Antonina -- Barilla, Rocky -- Daley, Donnele -- Greco, Stephanie H -- Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro -- Pergamo, Matthew -- Ochi, Atsuo -- Zambirinis, Constantinos P -- Pansari, Mridul -- Rendon, Mauricio -- Tippens, Daniel -- Hundeyin, Mautin -- Mani, Vishnu R -- Hajdu, Cristina -- Engle, Dannielle -- Miller, George -- CA155649/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA168611/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA193111/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30CA016087/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA168611/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA193111/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR000038/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 14;532(7598):245-9. doi: 10.1038/nature17403. Epub 2016 Apr 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉S. Arthur Localio Laboratory, Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, New York, New York 10016, USA. ; Department of Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, New York, New York 10016, USA. ; Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, New York, New York 10016, USA. ; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27049944" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenocarcinoma/immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Animals ; Apoptosis/drug effects ; *Carcinogenesis/drug effects ; Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation/drug effects ; Chemokine CXCL1/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism ; Deoxycytidine/analogs & derivatives/pharmacology ; Disease Progression ; Female ; GTPase-Activating Proteins/metabolism ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Humans ; *Immune Tolerance ; Lectins, C-Type/immunology/*metabolism ; Male ; Membrane Proteins/immunology/*metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; *Necrosis ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*immunology/metabolism/*pathology ; Receptor-Interacting Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Up-Regulation
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2016-04-05
    Description: Cancer is a disease of ageing. Clinically, aged cancer patients tend to have a poorer prognosis than young. This may be due to accumulated cellular damage, decreases in adaptive immunity, and chronic inflammation. However, the effects of the aged microenvironment on tumour progression have been largely unexplored. Since dermal fibroblasts can have profound impacts on melanoma progression, we examined whether age-related changes in dermal fibroblasts could drive melanoma metastasis and response to targeted therapy. Here we find that aged fibroblasts secrete a Wnt antagonist, sFRP2, which activates a multi-step signalling cascade in melanoma cells that results in a decrease in beta-catenin and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), and ultimately the loss of a key redox effector, APE1. Loss of APE1 attenuates the response of melanoma cells to DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species, rendering the cells more resistant to targeted therapy (vemurafenib). Age-related increases in sFRP2 also augment both angiogenesis and metastasis of melanoma cells. These data provide an integrated view of how fibroblasts in the aged microenvironment contribute to tumour progression, offering new possibilities for the design of therapy for the elderly.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4833579/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4833579/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kaur, Amanpreet -- Webster, Marie R -- Marchbank, Katie -- Behera, Reeti -- Ndoye, Abibatou -- Kugel, Curtis H 3rd -- Dang, Vanessa M -- Appleton, Jessica -- O'Connell, Michael P -- Cheng, Phil -- Valiga, Alexander A -- Morissette, Rachel -- McDonnell, Nazli B -- Ferrucci, Luigi -- Kossenkov, Andrew V -- Meeth, Katrina -- Tang, Hsin-Yao -- Yin, Xiangfan -- Wood, William H 3rd -- Lehrmann, Elin -- Becker, Kevin G -- Flaherty, Keith T -- Frederick, Dennie T -- Wargo, Jennifer A -- Cooper, Zachary A -- Tetzlaff, Michael T -- Hudgens, Courtney -- Aird, Katherine M -- Zhang, Rugang -- Xu, Xiaowei -- Liu, Qin -- Bartlett, Edmund -- Karakousis, Giorgos -- Eroglu, Zeynep -- Lo, Roger S -- Chan, Matthew -- Menzies, Alexander M -- Long, Georgina V -- Johnson, Douglas B -- Sosman, Jeffrey -- Schilling, Bastian -- Schadendorf, Dirk -- Speicher, David W -- Bosenberg, Marcus -- Ribas, Antoni -- Weeraratna, Ashani T -- P01 CA 114046-06/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA114046/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA010815/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA093372/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA174746/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA174746-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009171/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA9171-36/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 14;532(7598):250-4. doi: 10.1038/nature17392. Epub 2016 Apr 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Department of Dermatology, University of Zurich, Zurich CH-8006, Switzerland. ; The National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA. ; Department of Dermatology and Pathology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA. ; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Developmental Therapeutics, Boston 02114, Massachusetts, USA. ; Department of Surgical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Department of Medical Oncology, City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, California 91010, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Westmead 2145, Australia. ; Melanoma Institute Australia and The University of Sydney, Sydney 2000, Australia. ; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville Tennessee 37232, USA. ; Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, West German Cancer Center, University Duesburg-Essen, Essen, Germany. ; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 45127, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27042933" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Aging/*metabolism ; Animals ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Culture Media, Conditioned/pharmacology ; DNA Damage ; DNA-(Apurinic or Apyrimidinic Site) Lyase/metabolism ; Disease Progression ; *Drug Resistance, Neoplasm ; Fibroblasts/secretion ; Humans ; Indoles/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Male ; Melanoma/blood supply/*drug therapy/genetics/*pathology ; Membrane Proteins/*metabolism/secretion ; Mice ; Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor/metabolism ; Middle Aged ; Molecular Targeted Therapy ; *Neoplasm Metastasis ; Neovascularization, Pathologic ; Oxidative Stress ; Phenotype ; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism ; Sulfonamides/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; *Tumor Microenvironment ; Wnt Signaling Pathway ; Wnt1 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors ; beta Catenin/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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