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  • 1
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2011-12-23
    Description: Restriction factors, such as the retroviral complementary DNA deaminase APOBEC3G, are cellular proteins that dominantly block virus replication. The AIDS virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), produces the accessory factor Vif, which counteracts the host's antiviral defence by hijacking a ubiquitin ligase complex, containing CUL5, ELOC, ELOB and a RING-box protein, and targeting APOBEC3G for degradation. Here we reveal, using an affinity tag/purification mass spectrometry approach, that Vif additionally recruits the transcription cofactor CBF-beta to this ubiquitin ligase complex. CBF-beta, which normally functions in concert with RUNX DNA binding proteins, allows the reconstitution of a recombinant six-protein assembly that elicits specific polyubiquitination activity with APOBEC3G, but not the related deaminase APOBEC3A. Using RNA knockdown and genetic complementation studies, we also demonstrate that CBF-beta is required for Vif-mediated degradation of APOBEC3G and therefore for preserving HIV-1 infectivity. Finally, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Vif also binds to and requires CBF-beta to degrade rhesus macaque APOBEC3G, indicating functional conservation. Methods of disrupting the CBF-beta-Vif interaction might enable HIV-1 restriction and provide a supplement to current antiviral therapies that primarily target viral proteins.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3310910/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3310910/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jager, Stefanie -- Kim, Dong Young -- Hultquist, Judd F -- Shindo, Keisuke -- LaRue, Rebecca S -- Kwon, Eunju -- Li, Ming -- Anderson, Brett D -- Yen, Linda -- Stanley, David -- Mahon, Cathal -- Kane, Joshua -- Franks-Skiba, Kathy -- Cimermancic, Peter -- Burlingame, Alma -- Sali, Andrej -- Craik, Charles S -- Harris, Reuben S -- Gross, John D -- Krogan, Nevan J -- P01 AI090935/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01 GM091743/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103481/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41RR001614/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM081879/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM082250/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM082250-05/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50GM081879/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI064046/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI083196/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 RR022220/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Dec 21;481(7381):371-5. doi: 10.1038/nature10693.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22190037" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Affinity Labels ; Animals ; Core Binding Factor beta Subunit/*metabolism ; Cullin Proteins/metabolism ; Cytidine Deaminase/*metabolism ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Gene Products, vif/*metabolism ; Genetic Complementation Test ; HEK293 Cells ; HIV Infections/*metabolism/*virology ; HIV-1/*physiology ; Host-Pathogen Interactions ; Humans ; Jurkat Cells ; Macaca mulatta/metabolism/virology ; Mass Spectrometry ; Models, Biological ; Protein Binding ; Proteolysis ; Simian Immunodeficiency Virus/metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/chemistry/metabolism ; Ubiquitination ; Virus Replication ; vif Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2012-07-27
    Description: Medulloblastoma is an aggressively growing tumour, arising in the cerebellum or medulla/brain stem. It is the most common malignant brain tumour in children, and shows tremendous biological and clinical heterogeneity. Despite recent treatment advances, approximately 40% of children experience tumour recurrence, and 30% will die from their disease. Those who survive often have a significantly reduced quality of life. Four tumour subgroups with distinct clinical, biological and genetic profiles are currently identified. WNT tumours, showing activated wingless pathway signalling, carry a favourable prognosis under current treatment regimens. SHH tumours show hedgehog pathway activation, and have an intermediate prognosis. Group 3 and 4 tumours are molecularly less well characterized, and also present the greatest clinical challenges. The full repertoire of genetic events driving this distinction, however, remains unclear. Here we describe an integrative deep-sequencing analysis of 125 tumour-normal pairs, conducted as part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) PedBrain Tumor Project. Tetraploidy was identified as a frequent early event in Group 3 and 4 tumours, and a positive correlation between patient age and mutation rate was observed. Several recurrent mutations were identified, both in known medulloblastoma-related genes (CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4) and in genes not previously linked to this tumour (DDX3X, CTDNEP1, KDM6A, TBR1), often in subgroup-specific patterns. RNA sequencing confirmed these alterations, and revealed the expression of what are, to our knowledge, the first medulloblastoma fusion genes identified. Chromatin modifiers were frequently altered across all subgroups. These findings enhance our understanding of the genomic complexity and heterogeneity underlying medulloblastoma, and provide several potential targets for new therapeutics, especially for Group 3 and 4 patients.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662966/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662966/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jones, David T W -- Jager, Natalie -- Kool, Marcel -- Zichner, Thomas -- Hutter, Barbara -- Sultan, Marc -- Cho, Yoon-Jae -- Pugh, Trevor J -- Hovestadt, Volker -- Stutz, Adrian M -- Rausch, Tobias -- Warnatz, Hans-Jorg -- Ryzhova, Marina -- Bender, Sebastian -- Sturm, Dominik -- Pleier, Sabrina -- Cin, Huriye -- Pfaff, Elke -- Sieber, Laura -- Wittmann, Andrea -- Remke, Marc -- Witt, Hendrik -- Hutter, Sonja -- Tzaridis, Theophilos -- Weischenfeldt, Joachim -- Raeder, Benjamin -- Avci, Meryem -- Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav -- Zapatka, Marc -- Weber, Ursula D -- Wang, Qi -- Lasitschka, Barbel -- Bartholomae, Cynthia C -- Schmidt, Manfred -- von Kalle, Christof -- Ast, Volker -- Lawerenz, Chris -- Eils, Jurgen -- Kabbe, Rolf -- Benes, Vladimir -- van Sluis, Peter -- Koster, Jan -- Volckmann, Richard -- Shih, David -- Betts, Matthew J -- Russell, Robert B -- Coco, Simona -- Tonini, Gian Paolo -- Schuller, Ulrich -- Hans, Volkmar -- Graf, Norbert -- Kim, Yoo-Jin -- Monoranu, Camelia -- Roggendorf, Wolfgang -- Unterberg, Andreas -- Herold-Mende, Christel -- Milde, Till -- Kulozik, Andreas E -- von Deimling, Andreas -- Witt, Olaf -- Maass, Eberhard -- Rossler, Jochen -- Ebinger, Martin -- Schuhmann, Martin U -- Fruhwald, Michael C -- Hasselblatt, Martin -- Jabado, Nada -- Rutkowski, Stefan -- von Bueren, Andre O -- Williamson, Dan -- Clifford, Steven C -- McCabe, Martin G -- Collins, V Peter -- Wolf, Stephan -- Wiemann, Stefan -- Lehrach, Hans -- Brors, Benedikt -- Scheurlen, Wolfram -- Felsberg, Jorg -- Reifenberger, Guido -- Northcott, Paul A -- Taylor, Michael D -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Pomeroy, Scott L -- Yaspo, Marie-Laure -- Korbel, Jan O -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Eils, Roland -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Lichter, Peter -- P30 HD018655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA109467/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 2;488(7409):100-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11284.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22832583" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/genetics ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Cerebellar Neoplasms/classification/diagnosis/*genetics/pathology ; Child ; Chromatin/metabolism ; Chromosomes, Human/genetics ; DEAD-box RNA Helicases/genetics ; DNA Helicases/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; Hedgehog Proteins/metabolism ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing ; Histone Demethylases/genetics ; Humans ; Medulloblastoma/classification/diagnosis/*genetics/pathology ; Methylation ; Mutation/genetics ; Mutation Rate ; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Oncogene Proteins, Fusion/genetics ; Phosphoprotein Phosphatases/genetics ; Polyploidy ; Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Signal Transduction ; T-Box Domain Proteins/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics ; Wnt Proteins/metabolism ; beta Catenin/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2012-07-24
    Description: Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant brain tumours in children. Identifying and understanding the genetic events that drive these tumours is critical for the development of more effective diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies. Recently, our group and others described distinct molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma on the basis of transcriptional and copy number profiles. Here we use whole-exome hybrid capture and deep sequencing to identify somatic mutations across the coding regions of 92 primary medulloblastoma/normal pairs. Overall, medulloblastomas have low mutation rates consistent with other paediatric tumours, with a median of 0.35 non-silent mutations per megabase. We identified twelve genes mutated at statistically significant frequencies, including previously known mutated genes in medulloblastoma such as CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4 and TP53. Recurrent somatic mutations were newly identified in an RNA helicase gene, DDX3X, often concurrent with CTNNB1 mutations, and in the nuclear co-repressor (N-CoR) complex genes GPS2, BCOR and LDB1. We show that mutant DDX3X potentiates transactivation of a TCF promoter and enhances cell viability in combination with mutant, but not wild-type, beta-catenin. Together, our study reveals the alteration of WNT, hedgehog, histone methyltransferase and now N-CoR pathways across medulloblastomas and within specific subtypes of this disease, and nominates the RNA helicase DDX3X as a component of pathogenic beta-catenin signalling in medulloblastoma.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3413789/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3413789/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pugh, Trevor J -- Weeraratne, Shyamal Dilhan -- Archer, Tenley C -- Pomeranz Krummel, Daniel A -- Auclair, Daniel -- Bochicchio, James -- Carneiro, Mauricio O -- Carter, Scott L -- Cibulskis, Kristian -- Erlich, Rachel L -- Greulich, Heidi -- Lawrence, Michael S -- Lennon, Niall J -- McKenna, Aaron -- Meldrim, James -- Ramos, Alex H -- Ross, Michael G -- Russ, Carsten -- Shefler, Erica -- Sivachenko, Andrey -- Sogoloff, Brian -- Stojanov, Petar -- Tamayo, Pablo -- Mesirov, Jill P -- Amani, Vladimir -- Teider, Natalia -- Sengupta, Soma -- Francois, Jessica Pierre -- Northcott, Paul A -- Taylor, Michael D -- Yu, Furong -- Crabtree, Gerald R -- Kautzman, Amanda G -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Getz, Gad -- Jager, Natalie -- Jones, David T W -- Lichter, Peter -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Roberts, Thomas M -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Pomeroy, Scott L -- Cho, Yoon-Jae -- CA050661/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- L40 NS063706/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P30 HD018655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P30 HD18655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA030002/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA105607/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA109467/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA148699/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA154480/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01CA105607/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA109467/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA148699/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R25 NS070682/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R25NS070682/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 2;488(7409):106-10. doi: 10.1038/nature11329.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22820256" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cerebellar Neoplasms/classification/*genetics ; Child ; DEAD-box RNA Helicases/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Helicases/chemistry/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Exome/*genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Hedgehog Proteins/metabolism ; Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics ; LIM Domain Proteins/genetics ; Medulloblastoma/classification/*genetics ; Models, Molecular ; Mutation/*genetics ; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/chemistry/genetics ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics ; Protein Structure, Tertiary/genetics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/genetics ; Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics ; Repressor Proteins/genetics ; Signal Transduction ; TCF Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/chemistry/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics ; Wnt Proteins/metabolism ; beta Catenin/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2013-08-09
    Description: DNA methylation is a defining feature of mammalian cellular identity and is essential for normal development. Most cell types, except germ cells and pre-implantation embryos, display relatively stable DNA methylation patterns, with 70-80% of all CpGs being methylated. Despite recent advances, we still have a limited understanding of when, where and how many CpGs participate in genomic regulation. Here we report the in-depth analysis of 42 whole-genome bisulphite sequencing data sets across 30 diverse human cell and tissue types. We observe dynamic regulation for only 21.8% of autosomal CpGs within a normal developmental context, most of which are distal to transcription start sites. These dynamic CpGs co-localize with gene regulatory elements, particularly enhancers and transcription-factor-binding sites, which allow identification of key lineage-specific regulators. In addition, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) often contain single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with cell-type-related diseases as determined by genome-wide association studies. The results also highlight the general inefficiency of whole-genome bisulphite sequencing, as 70-80% of the sequencing reads across these data sets provided little or no relevant information about CpG methylation. To demonstrate further the utility of our DMR set, we use it to classify unknown samples and identify representative signature regions that recapitulate major DNA methylation dynamics. In summary, although in theory every CpG can change its methylation state, our results suggest that only a fraction does so as part of coordinated regulatory programs. Therefore, our selected DMRs can serve as a starting point to guide new, more effective reduced representation approaches to capture the most informative fraction of CpGs, as well as further pinpoint putative regulatory elements.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3821869/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3821869/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ziller, Michael J -- Gu, Hongcang -- Muller, Fabian -- Donaghey, Julie -- Tsai, Linus T-Y -- Kohlbacher, Oliver -- De Jager, Philip L -- Rosen, Evan D -- Bennett, David A -- Bernstein, Bradley E -- Gnirke, Andreas -- Meissner, Alexander -- ES017690/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- P01 GM099117/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P01GM099117/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30AG10161/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG017917/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01AG15819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01AG17917/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01AG36042/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017155/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017155/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Aug 22;500(7463):477-81. doi: 10.1038/nature12433. Epub 2013 Aug 7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23925113" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; CpG Islands/genetics ; *DNA Methylation ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Humans ; Organ Specificity ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Sulfites/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2014-05-23
    Description: Epigenetic alterations, that is, disruption of DNA methylation and chromatin architecture, are now acknowledged as a universal feature of tumorigenesis. Medulloblastoma, a clinically challenging, malignant childhood brain tumour, is no exception. Despite much progress from recent genomics studies, with recurrent changes identified in each of the four distinct tumour subgroups (WNT-pathway-activated, SHH-pathway-activated, and the less-well-characterized Group 3 and Group 4), many cases still lack an obvious genetic driver. Here we present whole-genome bisulphite-sequencing data from thirty-four human and five murine tumours plus eight human and three murine normal controls, augmented with matched whole-genome, RNA and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data. This comprehensive data set allowed us to decipher several features underlying the interplay between the genome, epigenome and transcriptome, and its effects on medulloblastoma pathophysiology. Most notable were highly prevalent regions of hypomethylation correlating with increased gene expression, extending tens of kilobases downstream of transcription start sites. Focal regions of low methylation linked to transcription-factor-binding sites shed light on differential transcriptional networks between subgroups, whereas increased methylation due to re-normalization of repressed chromatin in DNA methylation valleys was positively correlated with gene expression. Large, partially methylated domains affecting up to one-third of the genome showed increased mutation rates and gene silencing in a subgroup-specific fashion. Epigenetic alterations also affected novel medulloblastoma candidate genes (for example, LIN28B), resulting in alternative promoter usage and/or differential messenger RNA/microRNA expression. Analysis of mouse medulloblastoma and precursor-cell methylation demonstrated a somatic origin for many alterations. Our data provide insights into the epigenetic regulation of transcription and genome organization in medulloblastoma pathogenesis, which are probably also of importance in a wider developmental and disease context.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hovestadt, Volker -- Jones, David T W -- Picelli, Simone -- Wang, Wei -- Kool, Marcel -- Northcott, Paul A -- Sultan, Marc -- Stachurski, Katharina -- Ryzhova, Marina -- Warnatz, Hans-Jorg -- Ralser, Meryem -- Brun, Sonja -- Bunt, Jens -- Jager, Natalie -- Kleinheinz, Kortine -- Erkek, Serap -- Weber, Ursula D -- Bartholomae, Cynthia C -- von Kalle, Christof -- Lawerenz, Chris -- Eils, Jurgen -- Koster, Jan -- Versteeg, Rogier -- Milde, Till -- Witt, Olaf -- Schmidt, Sabine -- Wolf, Stephan -- Pietsch, Torsten -- Rutkowski, Stefan -- Scheurlen, Wolfram -- Taylor, Michael D -- Brors, Benedikt -- Felsberg, Jorg -- Reifenberger, Guido -- Borkhardt, Arndt -- Lehrach, Hans -- Wechsler-Reya, Robert J -- Eils, Roland -- Yaspo, Marie-Laure -- Landgraf, Pablo -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Zapatka, Marc -- Radlwimmer, Bernhard -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Lichter, Peter -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jun 26;510(7506):537-41. doi: 10.1038/nature13268. Epub 2014 May 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2]. ; 1] Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2]. ; Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Ihnestrasse 63-73, Berlin 14195, Germany. ; Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Clinical Immunology, Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf, Moorenstrasse 5, Dusseldorf 40225, Germany. ; Department of Neuropathology, NN Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute, 4th Tverskaya-Yamskaya 16, Moscow 125047, Russia. ; Tumor Initiation and Maintenance Program, National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Designated Cancer Center, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, QBI Building, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia [2] Department of Oncogenomics, AMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, the Netherlands. ; Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Meyerhofstrasse 1, Heidelberg 69117, Germany. ; 1] Division of Translational Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 460, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Data Management Facility, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Department of Oncogenomics, AMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, the Netherlands. ; 1] Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology & Immunology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Clinical Cooperation Unit Pediatric Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Genomics and Proteomics Core Facility, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Department of Neuropathology, University of Bonn Medical Center, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, Bonn 53105, Germany. ; Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, Hamburg 20246, Germany. ; Cnopf'sche Kinderklinik, Nurnberg Children's Hospital, St.-Johannis-Muhlgasse 19, Nurnberg 90419, Germany. ; 1] Program in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada [2] Division of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada [3] Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; 1] Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf, Moorenstrasse 5, Dusseldorf 40225, Germany [2] German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Institute of Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB), University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [3] Bioquant Center, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 267, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [4] Heidelberg Center for Personalised Oncology (DKFZ-HIPO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] Department of Neuropathology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 220, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Clinical Cooperation Unit Neuropathology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 220-221, Heidelberg, 69120 Germany. ; 1] Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology & Immunology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Heidelberg Center for Personalised Oncology (DKFZ-HIPO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24847876" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Binding Sites ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation ; DNA Methylation/*genetics ; Female ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; *Gene Silencing ; Genome/genetics ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Medulloblastoma/*genetics/pathology ; Mice ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics ; RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA/*methods ; Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2014-11-05
    Description: Genome-wide association studies have identified loci underlying human diseases, but the causal nucleotide changes and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we developed a fine-mapping algorithm to identify candidate causal variants for 21 autoimmune diseases from genotyping data. We integrated these predictions with transcription and cis-regulatory element annotations, derived by mapping RNA and chromatin in primary immune cells, including resting and stimulated CD4(+) T-cell subsets, regulatory T cells, CD8(+) T cells, B cells, and monocytes. We find that approximately 90% of causal variants are non-coding, with approximately 60% mapping to immune-cell enhancers, many of which gain histone acetylation and transcribe enhancer-associated RNA upon immune stimulation. Causal variants tend to occur near binding sites for master regulators of immune differentiation and stimulus-dependent gene activation, but only 10-20% directly alter recognizable transcription factor binding motifs. Rather, most non-coding risk variants, including those that alter gene expression, affect non-canonical sequence determinants not well-explained by current gene regulatory models.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4336207/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4336207/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Farh, Kyle Kai-How -- Marson, Alexander -- Zhu, Jiang -- Kleinewietfeld, Markus -- Housley, William J -- Beik, Samantha -- Shoresh, Noam -- Whitton, Holly -- Ryan, Russell J H -- Shishkin, Alexander A -- Hatan, Meital -- Carrasco-Alfonso, Marlene J -- Mayer, Dita -- Luckey, C John -- Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A -- De Jager, Philip L -- Kuchroo, Vijay K -- Epstein, Charles B -- Daly, Mark J -- Hafler, David A -- Bernstein, Bradley E -- 12-0089/Worldwide Cancer Research/United Kingdom -- AI039671/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI045757/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI046130/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI070352/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- ES017155/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GM093080/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HG004570/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- NS067305/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS24247/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P01 AI039671/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01 AI045757/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK063720/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS024247/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R37 NS024247/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007748/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017155/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI046130/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI070352/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG004570/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG006991/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 19;518(7539):337-43. doi: 10.1038/nature13835. Epub 2014 Oct 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Diabetes Center and Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815, USA [3] Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA [4] Center for Systems Biology and Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Departments of Neurology and Immunobiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA. ; Departments of Neurology and Immunobiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA. ; Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Program in Translational NeuroPsychiatric Genomics, Institute for the Neurosciences, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02142, USA [3] Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25363779" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Autoimmune Diseases/*genetics/immunology/pathology ; Base Sequence ; Chromatin/genetics ; Consensus Sequence/genetics ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/*genetics ; Epigenomics ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Humans ; Nucleotide Motifs ; Organ Specificity ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/*genetics ; T-Lymphocytes/immunology/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
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    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2013-06-15
    Description: Leprosy was endemic in Europe until the Middle Ages. Using DNA array capture, we have obtained genome sequences of Mycobacterium leprae from skeletons of five medieval leprosy cases from the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Denmark. In one case, the DNA was so well preserved that full de novo assembly of the ancient bacterial genome could be achieved through shotgun sequencing alone. The ancient M. leprae sequences were compared with those of 11 modern strains, representing diverse genotypes and geographic origins. The comparisons revealed remarkable genomic conservation during the past 1000 years, a European origin for leprosy in the Americas, and the presence of an M. leprae genotype in medieval Europe now commonly associated with the Middle East. The exceptional preservation of M. leprae biomarkers, both DNA and mycolic acids, in ancient skeletons has major implications for palaeomicrobiology and human pathogen evolution.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schuenemann, Verena J -- Singh, Pushpendra -- Mendum, Thomas A -- Krause-Kyora, Ben -- Jager, Gunter -- Bos, Kirsten I -- Herbig, Alexander -- Economou, Christos -- Benjak, Andrej -- Busso, Philippe -- Nebel, Almut -- Boldsen, Jesper L -- Kjellstrom, Anna -- Wu, Huihai -- Stewart, Graham R -- Taylor, G Michael -- Bauer, Peter -- Lee, Oona Y-C -- Wu, Houdini H T -- Minnikin, David E -- Besra, Gurdyal S -- Tucker, Katie -- Roffey, Simon -- Sow, Samba O -- Cole, Stewart T -- Nieselt, Kay -- Krause, Johannes -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Jul 12;341(6142):179-83. doi: 10.1126/science.1238286. Epub 2013 Jun 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Archaeological Sciences, University of Tubingen, 72070 Tubingen, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23765279" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bone and Bones/microbiology ; DNA, Bacterial/chemistry/genetics/isolation & purification ; Denmark ; Endemic Diseases/history ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Genome, Bacterial/*genetics ; Great Britain ; History, Medieval ; Humans ; Leprosy/epidemiology/history/*microbiology ; Mycobacterium leprae/*classification/*genetics/isolation & purification ; Mycolic Acids/chemistry ; Phylogeny ; Sweden ; Tooth/microbiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
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    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2014-09-13
    Description: T lymphocyte activation by antigen conditions adaptive immune responses and immunopathologies, but we know little about its variation in humans and its genetic or environmental roots. We analyzed gene expression in CD4(+) T cells during unbiased activation or in T helper 17 (T(H)17) conditions from 348 healthy participants representing European, Asian, and African ancestries. We observed interindividual variability, most marked for cytokine transcripts, with clear biases on the basis of ancestry, and following patterns more complex than simple T(H)1/2/17 partitions. We identified 39 genetic loci specifically associated in cis with activated gene expression. We further fine-mapped and validated a single-base variant that modulates YY1 binding and the activity of an enhancer element controlling the autoimmune-associated IL2RA gene, affecting its activity in activated but not regulatory T cells. Thus, interindividual variability affects the fundamental immunologic process of T helper activation, with important connections to autoimmune disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4751028/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4751028/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ye, Chun Jimmie -- Feng, Ting -- Kwon, Ho-Keun -- Raj, Towfique -- Wilson, Michael T -- Asinovski, Natasha -- McCabe, Cristin -- Lee, Michelle H -- Frohlich, Irene -- Paik, Hyun-il -- Zaitlen, Noah -- Hacohen, Nir -- Stranger, Barbara -- De Jager, Philip -- Mathis, Diane -- Regev, Aviv -- Benoist, Christophe -- F32 AG043267/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- RC2 GM093080/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Sep 12;345(6202):1254665. doi: 10.1126/science.1254665.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Division of Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Program in Translational NeuroPsychiatric Genomics, Institute for the Neurosciences, Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Program in Translational NeuroPsychiatric Genomics, Institute for the Neurosciences, Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Department of Medicine Lung Biology Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. ; Section of Genetic Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ; Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Division of Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. aregev@broad.mit.edu cbdm@hms.harvard.edu. ; Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Division of Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. aregev@broad.mit.edu cbdm@hms.harvard.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25214635" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: African Continental Ancestry Group/genetics ; Asian Continental Ancestry Group/genetics ; Autoimmunity/*genetics ; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Cytokines/genetics ; European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation/*immunology ; Genetic Variation ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Humans ; Lymphocyte Activation/*genetics ; Multigene Family ; *Quantitative Trait Loci ; Th17 Cells/*immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
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    Unknown
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2012-01-31
    Description: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal brain tumour in adults and children. However, DNA copy number and gene expression signatures indicate differences between adult and paediatric cases. To explore the genetic events underlying this distinction, we sequenced the exomes of 48 paediatric GBM samples. Somatic mutations in the H3.3-ATRX-DAXX chromatin remodelling pathway were identified in 44% of tumours (21/48). Recurrent mutations in H3F3A, which encodes the replication-independent histone 3 variant H3.3, were observed in 31% of tumours, and led to amino acid substitutions at two critical positions within the histone tail (K27M, G34R/G34V) involved in key regulatory post-translational modifications. Mutations in ATRX (alpha-thalassaemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked) and DAXX (death-domain associated protein), encoding two subunits of a chromatin remodelling complex required for H3.3 incorporation at pericentric heterochromatin and telomeres, were identified in 31% of samples overall, and in 100% of tumours harbouring a G34R or G34V H3.3 mutation. Somatic TP53 mutations were identified in 54% of all cases, and in 86% of samples with H3F3A and/or ATRX mutations. Screening of a large cohort of gliomas of various grades and histologies (n = 784) showed H3F3A mutations to be specific to GBM and highly prevalent in children and young adults. Furthermore, the presence of H3F3A/ATRX-DAXX/TP53 mutations was strongly associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres and specific gene expression profiles. This is, to our knowledge, the first report to highlight recurrent mutations in a regulatory histone in humans, and our data suggest that defects of the chromatin architecture underlie paediatric and young adult GBM pathogenesis.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schwartzentruber, Jeremy -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Liu, Xiao-Yang -- Jones, David T W -- Pfaff, Elke -- Jacob, Karine -- Sturm, Dominik -- Fontebasso, Adam M -- Quang, Dong-Anh Khuong -- Tonjes, Martje -- Hovestadt, Volker -- Albrecht, Steffen -- Kool, Marcel -- Nantel, Andre -- Konermann, Carolin -- Lindroth, Anders -- Jager, Natalie -- Rausch, Tobias -- Ryzhova, Marina -- Korbel, Jan O -- Hielscher, Thomas -- Hauser, Peter -- Garami, Miklos -- Klekner, Almos -- Bognar, Laszlo -- Ebinger, Martin -- Schuhmann, Martin U -- Scheurlen, Wolfram -- Pekrun, Arnulf -- Fruhwald, Michael C -- Roggendorf, Wolfgang -- Kramm, Christoph -- Durken, Matthias -- Atkinson, Jeffrey -- Lepage, Pierre -- Montpetit, Alexandre -- Zakrzewska, Magdalena -- Zakrzewski, Krzystof -- Liberski, Pawel P -- Dong, Zhifeng -- Siegel, Peter -- Kulozik, Andreas E -- Zapatka, Marc -- Guha, Abhijit -- Malkin, David -- Felsberg, Jorg -- Reifenberger, Guido -- von Deimling, Andreas -- Ichimura, Koichi -- Collins, V Peter -- Witt, Hendrik -- Milde, Till -- Witt, Olaf -- Zhang, Cindy -- Castelo-Branco, Pedro -- Lichter, Peter -- Faury, Damien -- Tabori, Uri -- Plass, Christoph -- Majewski, Jacek -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Jabado, Nada -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jan 29;482(7384):226-31. doi: 10.1038/nature10833.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec H3A 1A4, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22286061" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics ; Base Sequence ; Child ; Chromatin/*genetics/metabolism ; Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly/*genetics ; DNA Helicases/genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Exome/genetics ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Glioblastoma/*genetics ; Histones/*genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation/*genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Telomere/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2014-01-07
    Description: A major challenge in human genetics is to devise a systematic strategy to integrate disease-associated variants with diverse genomic and biological data sets to provide insight into disease pathogenesis and guide drug discovery for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we performed a genome-wide association study meta-analysis in a total of 〉100,000 subjects of European and Asian ancestries (29,880 RA cases and 73,758 controls), by evaluating approximately 10 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We discovered 42 novel RA risk loci at a genome-wide level of significance, bringing the total to 101 (refs 2 - 4). We devised an in silico pipeline using established bioinformatics methods based on functional annotation, cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci and pathway analyses--as well as novel methods based on genetic overlap with human primary immunodeficiency, haematological cancer somatic mutations and knockout mouse phenotypes--to identify 98 biological candidate genes at these 101 risk loci. We demonstrate that these genes are the targets of approved therapies for RA, and further suggest that drugs approved for other indications may be repurposed for the treatment of RA. Together, this comprehensive genetic study sheds light on fundamental genes, pathways and cell types that contribute to RA pathogenesis, and provides empirical evidence that the genetics of RA can provide important information for drug discovery.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3944098/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3944098/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Okada, Yukinori -- Wu, Di -- Trynka, Gosia -- Raj, Towfique -- Terao, Chikashi -- Ikari, Katsunori -- Kochi, Yuta -- Ohmura, Koichiro -- Suzuki, Akari -- Yoshida, Shinji -- Graham, Robert R -- Manoharan, Arun -- Ortmann, Ward -- Bhangale, Tushar -- Denny, Joshua C -- Carroll, Robert J -- Eyler, Anne E -- Greenberg, Jeffrey D -- Kremer, Joel M -- Pappas, Dimitrios A -- Jiang, Lei -- Yin, Jian -- Ye, Lingying -- Su, Ding-Feng -- Yang, Jian -- Xie, Gang -- Keystone, Ed -- Westra, Harm-Jan -- Esko, Tonu -- Metspalu, Andres -- Zhou, Xuezhong -- Gupta, Namrata -- Mirel, Daniel -- Stahl, Eli A -- Diogo, Dorothee -- Cui, Jing -- Liao, Katherine -- Guo, Michael H -- Myouzen, Keiko -- Kawaguchi, Takahisa -- Coenen, Marieke J H -- van Riel, Piet L C M -- van de Laar, Mart A F J -- Guchelaar, Henk-Jan -- Huizinga, Tom W J -- Dieude, Philippe -- Mariette, Xavier -- Bridges, S Louis Jr -- Zhernakova, Alexandra -- Toes, Rene E M -- Tak, Paul P -- Miceli-Richard, Corinne -- Bang, So-Young -- Lee, Hye-Soon -- Martin, Javier -- Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A -- Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis -- Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt -- Arlestig, Lisbeth -- Choi, Hyon K -- Kamatani, Yoichiro -- Galan, Pilar -- Lathrop, Mark -- RACI consortium -- GARNET consortium -- Eyre, Steve -- Bowes, John -- Barton, Anne -- de Vries, Niek -- Moreland, Larry W -- Criswell, Lindsey A -- Karlson, Elizabeth W -- Taniguchi, Atsuo -- Yamada, Ryo -- Kubo, Michiaki -- Liu, Jun S -- Bae, Sang-Cheol -- Worthington, Jane -- Padyukov, Leonid -- Klareskog, Lars -- Gregersen, Peter K -- Raychaudhuri, Soumya -- Stranger, Barbara E -- De Jager, Philip L -- Franke, Lude -- Visscher, Peter M -- Brown, Matthew A -- Yamanaka, Hisashi -- Mimori, Tsuneyo -- Takahashi, Atsushi -- Xu, Huji -- Behrens, Timothy W -- Siminovitch, Katherine A -- Momohara, Shigeki -- Matsuda, Fumihiko -- Yamamoto, Kazuhiko -- Plenge, Robert M -- 20385/Arthritis Research UK/United Kingdom -- 79321/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- K08-KAR055688A/PHS HHS/ -- K24 AR052403/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- P60 AR047785/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR056768/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR057108/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR059648/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR063759/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-AR056291/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-AR056768/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-AR057108/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-AR059648/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-AR065944/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01AR063759-01A1/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R21 AR056042/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- T15 LM007450/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- U01 GM092691/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01-GM092691/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U19 HL065962/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 20;506(7488):376-81. doi: 10.1038/nature12873. Epub 2013 Dec 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [3] Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [3] Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [4] Department of Statistics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. [5] Centre for Cancer Research, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia. ; 1] Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Program in Translational NeuroPsychiatric Genomics, Institute for the Neurosciences, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Center for Genomic Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan. [2] Department of Rheumatology and Clinical immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan. ; Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo 162-0054, Japan. ; Laboratory for Autoimmune Diseases, Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan. ; Department of Rheumatology and Clinical immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan. ; Immunology Biomarkers Group, Genentech, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; 1] Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York 10003, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Albany Medical Center and The Center for Rheumatology, Albany, New York 12206, USA. ; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, New York, Presbyterian Hospital, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003, China. ; Department of Pharmacology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. ; 1] University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. [2] Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. ; 1] Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5, Canada. [2] Toronto General Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada. [3] Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2J7, Canada. ; Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 2J7, Canada. ; Department of Genetics, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9700 RB, the Netherlands. ; 1] Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Estonian Genome Center, University of Tartu, Riia 23b, Tartu 51010, Estonia. [3] Division of Endocrinology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Estonian Genome Center, University of Tartu, Riia 23b, Tartu 51010, Estonia. ; School of Computer and Information Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044, China. ; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; The Department of Psychiatry at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA. ; 1] Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Division of Endocrinology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Center for Genomic Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan. ; Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen 6500 HB, the Netherlands. ; Department of Rheumatology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen 6500 HB, the Netherlands. ; Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Arthritis Center Twente, University Twente & Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede 7500 AE, the Netherlands. ; Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Toxicology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden 2300 RC, the Netherlands. ; Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden 2300 RC, the Netherlands. ; 1] Service de Rhumatologie et INSERM U699 Hopital Bichat Claude Bernard, Assistance Publique des Hopitaux de Paris, Paris 75018, France. [2] Universite Paris 7-Diderot, Paris 75013, France. ; Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) U1012, Universite Paris-Sud, Rhumatologie, Hopitaux Universitaires Paris-Sud, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Le Kremlin Bicetre 94275, France. ; Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA. ; 1] Department of Genetics, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9700 RB, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden 2300 RC, the Netherlands. ; 1] AMC/University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, the Netherlands. [2] GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage SG1 2NY, UK. [3] University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN, UK. ; Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul 133-792, South Korea. ; Instituto de Parasitologia y Biomedicina Lopez-Neyra, CSIC, Granada 18100, Spain. ; Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, IFIMAV, Santander 39008, Spain. ; Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid 28040, Spain. ; 1] Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umea SE-901 87, Sweden. [2] Department of Rheumatology, Umea University, Umea SE-901 87, Sweden. ; 1] Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02115, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Section of Rheumatology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA. [3] Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA. ; Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH), Paris 75010, France. ; Universite Paris 13 Sorbonne Paris Cite, UREN (Nutritional Epidemiology Research Unit), Inserm (U557), Inra (U1125), Cnam, Bobigny 93017, France. ; McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G1 Canada. ; 1] Arthritis Research UK Epidemiology Unit, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M13 9NT, UK. [2] National Institute for Health Research, Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Central Manchester University Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester M13 9NT, UK. ; Arthritis Research UK Epidemiology Unit, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M13 9NT, UK. ; Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology & Department of Genome Analysis, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, the Netherlands. ; Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. ; Rosalind Russell Medical Research Center for Arthritis, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94117, USA. ; Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Unit of Statistical Genetics, Center for Genomic Medicine Graduate School of Medicine Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan. ; Laboratory for Genotyping Development, Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan. ; Department of Statistics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm SE-171 76, Sweden. ; The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset, New York 11030, USA. ; 1] Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [3] Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [4] NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical, Research Unit, Central Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester M13 9NT, UK. ; 1] Section of Genetic Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. [2] Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. ; Laboratory for Statistical Analysis, Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan. ; 1] Center for Genomic Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan. [2] Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) program, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan. [3] Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) Unite U852, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan. ; 1] Laboratory for Autoimmune Diseases, Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, RIKEN, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan. [2] Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24390342" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Animals ; Arthritis, Rheumatoid/*drug therapy/*genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Asian Continental Ancestry Group/genetics ; Case-Control Studies ; Computational Biology ; *Drug Discovery ; Drug Repositioning ; European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics ; Female ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Hematologic Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; *Molecular Targeted Therapy ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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