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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-12-23
    Description: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has a small genome and therefore relies heavily on the host cellular machinery to replicate. Identifying which host proteins and complexes come into physical contact with the viral proteins is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of how HIV rewires the host's cellular machinery during the course of infection. Here we report the use of affinity tagging and purification mass spectrometry to determine systematically the physical interactions of all 18 HIV-1 proteins and polyproteins with host proteins in two different human cell lines (HEK293 and Jurkat). Using a quantitative scoring system that we call MiST, we identified with high confidence 497 HIV-human protein-protein interactions involving 435 individual human proteins, with approximately 40% of the interactions being identified in both cell types. We found that the host proteins hijacked by HIV, especially those found interacting in both cell types, are highly conserved across primates. We uncovered a number of host complexes targeted by viral proteins, including the finding that HIV protease cleaves eIF3d, a subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3. This host protein is one of eleven identified in this analysis that act to inhibit HIV replication. This data set facilitates a more comprehensive and detailed understanding of how the host machinery is manipulated during the course of HIV infection.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3310911/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3310911/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jager, Stefanie -- Cimermancic, Peter -- Gulbahce, Natali -- Johnson, Jeffrey R -- McGovern, Kathryn E -- Clarke, Starlynn C -- Shales, Michael -- Mercenne, Gaelle -- Pache, Lars -- Li, Kathy -- Hernandez, Hilda -- Jang, Gwendolyn M -- Roth, Shoshannah L -- Akiva, Eyal -- Marlett, John -- Stephens, Melanie -- D'Orso, Ivan -- Fernandes, Jason -- Fahey, Marie -- Mahon, Cathal -- O'Donoghue, Anthony J -- Todorovic, Aleksandar -- Morris, John H -- Maltby, David A -- Alber, Tom -- Cagney, Gerard -- Bushman, Frederic D -- Young, John A -- Chanda, Sumit K -- Sundquist, Wesley I -- Kortemme, Tanja -- Hernandez, Ryan D -- Craik, Charles S -- Burlingame, Alma -- Sali, Andrej -- Frankel, Alan D -- Krogan, Nevan J -- P01 AI090935/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01 AI090935-02/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01 GM073732-05/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103481/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 RR001081/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P41RR001614/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM081879/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM081879-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM082250/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM082250-05/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50GM081879/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50GM082545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 RR022220/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Dec 21;481(7381):365-70. doi: 10.1038/nature10719.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94158, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22190034" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Affinity Labels ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Conserved Sequence ; Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-3/chemistry/metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; HIV Infections/metabolism/virology ; HIV Protease/metabolism ; HIV-1/*chemistry/*metabolism/physiology ; *Host-Pathogen Interactions ; Human Immunodeficiency Virus Proteins/analysis/chemistry/isolation & ; purification/*metabolism ; Humans ; Immunoprecipitation ; Jurkat Cells ; Mass Spectrometry ; Protein Binding ; Protein Interaction Mapping/*methods ; Protein Interaction Maps/*physiology ; Reproducibility of Results ; Virus Replication
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-12-04
    Description: The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is one of two general protein transport systems found in the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane and is conserved in the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. The defining, and highly unusual, property of the Tat pathway is that it transports folded proteins, a task that must be achieved without allowing appreciable ion leakage across the membrane. The integral membrane TatC protein is the central component of the Tat pathway. TatC captures substrate proteins by binding their signal peptides. TatC then recruits TatA family proteins to form the active translocation complex. Here we report the crystal structure of TatC from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This structure provides a molecular description of the core of the Tat translocation system and a framework for understanding the unique Tat transport mechanism.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3573685/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3573685/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rollauer, Sarah E -- Tarry, Michael J -- Graham, James E -- Jaaskelainen, Mari -- Jager, Franziska -- Johnson, Steven -- Krehenbrink, Martin -- Liu, Sai-Man -- Lukey, Michael J -- Marcoux, Julien -- McDowell, Melanie A -- Rodriguez, Fernanda -- Roversi, Pietro -- Stansfeld, Phillip J -- Robinson, Carol V -- Sansom, Mark S P -- Palmer, Tracy -- Hogbom, Martin -- Berks, Ben C -- Lea, Susan M -- 083599/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 088150/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 092970/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 092970MA/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- BB/1019855/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E023347/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/F02150X/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I019855/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0900888/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0900888(92020)/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G100164/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G1001640/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G1001640/1/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Dec 13;492(7428):210-4. doi: 10.1038/nature11683. Epub 2012 Dec 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23201679" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; Escherichia coli/genetics ; Gram-Negative Bacteria/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Membrane Transport Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism ; *Models, Molecular ; Protein Binding ; Protein Sorting Signals ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Recombinant Proteins/chemistry/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2011-12-23
    Description: Restriction factors, such as the retroviral complementary DNA deaminase APOBEC3G, are cellular proteins that dominantly block virus replication. The AIDS virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), produces the accessory factor Vif, which counteracts the host's antiviral defence by hijacking a ubiquitin ligase complex, containing CUL5, ELOC, ELOB and a RING-box protein, and targeting APOBEC3G for degradation. Here we reveal, using an affinity tag/purification mass spectrometry approach, that Vif additionally recruits the transcription cofactor CBF-beta to this ubiquitin ligase complex. CBF-beta, which normally functions in concert with RUNX DNA binding proteins, allows the reconstitution of a recombinant six-protein assembly that elicits specific polyubiquitination activity with APOBEC3G, but not the related deaminase APOBEC3A. Using RNA knockdown and genetic complementation studies, we also demonstrate that CBF-beta is required for Vif-mediated degradation of APOBEC3G and therefore for preserving HIV-1 infectivity. Finally, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Vif also binds to and requires CBF-beta to degrade rhesus macaque APOBEC3G, indicating functional conservation. Methods of disrupting the CBF-beta-Vif interaction might enable HIV-1 restriction and provide a supplement to current antiviral therapies that primarily target viral proteins.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3310910/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3310910/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jager, Stefanie -- Kim, Dong Young -- Hultquist, Judd F -- Shindo, Keisuke -- LaRue, Rebecca S -- Kwon, Eunju -- Li, Ming -- Anderson, Brett D -- Yen, Linda -- Stanley, David -- Mahon, Cathal -- Kane, Joshua -- Franks-Skiba, Kathy -- Cimermancic, Peter -- Burlingame, Alma -- Sali, Andrej -- Craik, Charles S -- Harris, Reuben S -- Gross, John D -- Krogan, Nevan J -- P01 AI090935/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01 GM091743/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103481/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41RR001614/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM081879/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM082250/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM082250-05/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50GM081879/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI064046/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI083196/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 RR022220/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Dec 21;481(7381):371-5. doi: 10.1038/nature10693.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22190037" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Affinity Labels ; Animals ; Core Binding Factor beta Subunit/*metabolism ; Cullin Proteins/metabolism ; Cytidine Deaminase/*metabolism ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Gene Products, vif/*metabolism ; Genetic Complementation Test ; HEK293 Cells ; HIV Infections/*metabolism/*virology ; HIV-1/*physiology ; Host-Pathogen Interactions ; Humans ; Jurkat Cells ; Macaca mulatta/metabolism/virology ; Mass Spectrometry ; Models, Biological ; Protein Binding ; Proteolysis ; Simian Immunodeficiency Virus/metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/chemistry/metabolism ; Ubiquitination ; Virus Replication ; vif Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
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    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2015-06-06
    Description: Circadian and metabolic physiology are intricately intertwined, as illustrated by Rev-erbalpha, a transcription factor (TF) that functions both as a core repressive component of the cell-autonomous clock and as a regulator of metabolic genes. Here, we show that Rev-erbalpha modulates the clock and metabolism by different genomic mechanisms. Clock control requires Rev-erbalpha to bind directly to the genome at its cognate sites, where it competes with activating ROR TFs. By contrast, Rev-erbalpha regulates metabolic genes primarily by recruiting the HDAC3 co-repressor to sites to which it is tethered by cell type-specific transcription factors. Thus, direct competition between Rev-erbalpha and ROR TFs provides a universal mechanism for self-sustained control of the molecular clock across all tissues, whereas Rev-erbalpha uses lineage-determining factors to convey a tissue-specific epigenomic rhythm that regulates metabolism tailored to the specific need of that tissue.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4613749/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4613749/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Yuxiang -- Fang, Bin -- Emmett, Matthew J -- Damle, Manashree -- Sun, Zheng -- Feng, Dan -- Armour, Sean M -- Remsberg, Jarrett R -- Jager, Jennifer -- Soccio, Raymond E -- Steger, David J -- Lazar, Mitchell A -- F30 DK104513/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F32 DK102284/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K08 DK094968/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK019525/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK050306/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK19525/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R00 DK099443/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK045586/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK098542/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK45586/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM0008275/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008275/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 26;348(6242):1488-92. doi: 10.1126/science.aab3021. Epub 2015 Jun 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Department of Genetics, and the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Department of Genetics, and the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. ; Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Department of Genetics, and the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. lazar@mail.med.upenn.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26044300" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; CLOCK Proteins/*genetics ; Circadian Clocks/*genetics ; Circadian Rhythm/*genetics ; *Gene Expression Regulation ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6/metabolism ; Histone Deacetylases/*metabolism ; Lipid Metabolism/genetics ; Liver/metabolism ; Male ; Metabolism/*genetics ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Knockout ; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group D, Member 1/genetics/*metabolism ; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group F, Member 1/metabolism ; Organ Specificity ; Protein Binding ; Tissue Distribution
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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