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  • 11
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
    Molecular microbiology 55 (2005), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-2958
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: We recently demonstrated that Campylobacter jejuni produces a capsular polysaccharide (CPS) that is the major antigenic component of the classical Penner serotyping system distinguishing Campylobacter into 〉60 groups. Although the wide variety of C. jejuni serotypes are suggestive of structural differences in CPS, the genetic mechanisms of such differences are unknown. In this study we sequenced biosynthetic cps regions, ranging in size from 15 to 34 kb, from selected C. jejuni strains of HS:1, HS:19, HS:23, HS:36, HS:23/36 and HS:41 serotypes. Comparison of the determined cps sequences of the HS:1, HS:19 and HS:41 strains with the sequenced strain, NCTC11168 (HS:2), provides evidence for multiple mechanisms of structural variation including exchange of capsular genes and entire clusters by horizontal transfer, gene duplication, deletion, fusion and contingency gene variation. In contrast, the HS:23, HS:36 and HS:23/36 cps sequences were highly conserved. We report the first detailed structural analysis of 81-176 (HS:23/36) and G1 (HS:1) and refine the previous structural interpretations of the HS:19, HS:23, HS:36 and HS:41 serostrains. For the first time, we demonstrate the commonality and function of a second heptose biosynthetic pathway for Campylobacter CPS independent of the pathway for lipooligosaccharide (LOS) biosynthesis and identify a novel heptosyltransferase utilized by this alternate pathway. Furthermore, we show the retention of two functional heptose isomerases in Campylobacter and the sharing of a phosphatase for both LOS and CPS heptose biosynthesis.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 12
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science Ltd
    Molecular microbiology 39 (2001), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-2958
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: We have identified a gene for the addition of N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) in an α-2,3-linkage to a lactosyl acceptor moiety of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. The gene is one that was identified previously as a phase-variable gene known as lic3A. Extracts of H. influenzae, as well as recombinant Escherichia coli strains producing Lic3A, demonstrate sialyltransferase activity in assays using synthetic fluorescent acceptors with a terminal galactosyl, lactosyl or N-acetyl-lactosaminyl moiety. In the RM118 strain of H. influenzae, Lic3A activity is modulated by the action of another phase-variable glycosyltransferase, LgtC, which competes for the same lactosyl acceptor moiety. Structural analysis of LPS from a RM118:lgtC mutant and the non-typeable strain 486 using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed that the major sialylated species has a sialyl-α-(2–3)-lactosyl extension off the distal heptose. This sialylated glycoform was absent in strains containing a lic3A gene disruption. Low amounts of sialylated higher molecular mass glycoforms were present in RM118:lgtC lic3A, indicating the presence of a second sialyltransferase. Lic3A mutants of H. influenzae strains show reduced resistance to the killing effects of normal human serum. Lic3A, encoding an α-2,3-sialyltransferase activity, is the first reported phase-variable sialyltransferase gene.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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